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Emerson Everett Glass
(American Impressionist, 1916 - 1987)
Commentary and Price List

Image
Comments
Price
"Mysterious Moon", Oil on Panel, 8 X 11 Inches   SOLD

A small but major work.  Sometimes the moon simply creeps up on you, barely without notice.  Then suddenly you become aware of its presence, and declare "look at the moon!".  On the darkest night, when such an event happens, the moon seems to be coming right out of the woods and into your lap.  It appears so large and close, that you want to reach out and touch it.  Well, it could happen.

In this wonderfully dark painting by EEG, the night is close all around, and only a moment ago, when one was without light, dare not move about too much.  The trees are there, but seem to be not there.  The trees simply represent the darkness in a more tangible form.  Their presence almost goes without notice untill the light of the moon throws them into stark relief against a slightly bluing sky.  The stars are not just bright, they ARE the sky, the only visible evidence of existence... that is, until the moon shows up and becomes the dominent character of the night.

We can all relate to the moon in one perspective or another. But no matter what one's perspective, the moon offers comfort on a lonely night; on a cold night; on a scary night.  The moon is reassuring in its quiet stability, like it's saying "I got this, I'm watching over you".  This painting represents all that the moon meant to Emerson Glass:  a welcome guest during his nights alone in the mountains.  And always accompanied by the evening star, romantically and poetically representing his wife, Nina Glass.  It is in such a work that the most personal thoughts of the artist come out and make them clear to his now growing audience.
$950

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"Setting Sun, Rising Moon on an Ancient Pine", Oil on Panel, 12 X 16 Inches   SOLD

This major work is iconic for the artist, a summation of all his work...  the culmination of impressionist color theory and use of dramatic lighting.  We have seen many paintings of pines and cedars found on the high ridges of the Rocky Mountains, which simply reveal how the artist was drawn to the subject.  This was a kind of symbiotic relationship that captured his heart and soul, demanding that he pour his vision and abilities into it.

Of particular interest is that the tree's trunk and branches are made up of only the three primaries (red, yellow and blue), while the entire remainder of the painting is composed mostly of secondary colors of green, orange and violet (with some primaries as well). The color interactions make for dramatic lighting that suggests the theatrics of chiaroscuro and, in the end, a vibrant and resonant painting.

The tree itself is of a noble character.  It stands alone after a long and healthy life.  We see these pines and cedars often in the western United States, seeming to grow right out of solid rock.  In fact, it's the seed that falls among the protecting rocks that takes root and has the greatest chance for survival.  Once germinated, the roots cling tenaciously to the rocks and reach deep for nutrients below the frost line.  This fine old tree stands as a testimony to survival in harsh elements, defined in character by Emerson Glass.
$1,250

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"Westwind with Rising Moon", 1971, Oil on Panel, 8 X 11 Inches   SOLD

An old torn and worn label on the back is nearly illegible, except for the hand written date "1971".  An exceptional and carefully painted palette knife sky reveals the entire spectrum of colors.  The considerable amount of mixing of colors and dynamic interactions are difficult to see in the smaller images, but can be explored more in the larger detail images.  Even after handling the artist's paintings for 6 years, we are only beginning to appreciate the quality of the palette knife techniques developed over a lifetime of work by EEG.

Just as the great impressionists of the turn of the 20th century painted the same scenes over and over again, E E Glass returns to the same scenes and subjects to explore to the uttermost the combinations of color and light and dark to create vibrant and dynamic paintings.  We find old familiar friends in this painting:  the slender bent cedar, shaped by the elements, the rock grouping and the distant mountains... all of which are used for their special contributions of color to the overall scene and make for greater dynamics and luminous effects.

As I write these words to describe this painting, I am struck by one thing:  how it is that the same scenes done by EEG can be painted over and again, only to become new and interesting, simply by the exporation of color techniques.  I am always encouraging others to stop for just a moment to take a more studied look at the very things I write about over and again.  It may sound a bit trite, but the end effects are there to delight anyone who will take that extra time to see the varied differences in the work of EEG.
$750

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"Aspens at Dusk", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches   SOLD

Dusk... that time between light and dark.  Dusk, a time when just the last feeble rays of light touch the surrounding environment and give it an aura like no other time.  But, dusk is fleeting, the light uncertain.  The blue of the sky has darkened, the crescent moon is barely there, barely visible, and the light of the setting sun is hitting a small stand of aspens and brush, throwing them into a brilliant burst of light.

The light is shimmering and vibrant, sparkling like gems, as the leaves of the aspen quake under even the slightest breeze.  Their vibrancy is made even more so with the interplay of complimentary colors.  The blue of the background sky is compliment to orange, which is made up of the red and yellows of the trees.  Interestingly, the whole painting is done on a bright green underpainting, which, when allowed to peak through by the palette knife techniques, adds to the vibrancy (especially of red).

The paint is applied with an urgent feel, thick and bold.  The colors mingle under the deft hand of the artist's knife, and at just the right places, the bright green underpainting is allowed to show through.  This push-and-pull of color produces the vibrancy in more ways than one... relying on the viewer's eyes to accept visual excitement in the form of this simple subject that is painted with sophistication and complexity.  A fine work by E E Glass.
$650

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"Last Light on a Outcropping of Rocks", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches   SOLD
"Fire Storm", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches   SOLD

Two unusual works by EEG.  These paintings concentrate on different aspects of light, either by exploring complementary colors or through the use of light and dark contrasts.  We have full narratives on each of these works which we are happy to send upon your request by email.

You can see the difference between techniques either by brush or palette knife work in thse paintings.
$650
Each

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"Sandzen Moon", Oil on Panel, 8 X 8 Inches   SOLD

We just had to pay homage to Birger Sandzen in the title of this fine small painting.  It has Sandzen written (or painted) all over it... the urgent brushwork, the color and the very composition reminds us of the mentor of EEG.  We do not call the work of E E Glass a "poor man's Sandzen", but rather a "rich man's E E Glass".

This painting is a total expression of both the primary (red, yellow and blue) and secondary (orange, green and purple or violet) colors.  The primary colors are combined to form the secondary colors, and laid on in such a juxtapostion that each are made more vibrant because of the other.  The result is a fine exercise of the impressionist "manifesto"... the defining of the subject by its color rather than form.

This painting is fully worked and a complete statement all its own.  Each element is carefully defined and takes its place in the composition as naturally as if one was sitting on a rock by the lake watching the moonrise in person.  We "know" that this is not a photo representation of the scene, but it's the sense and feel of the quiet moonrise that puts us in the location to enjoy the moment before the setting sun goes hidden behind us completely.  A work worth the effort and expression by EEG.
$950

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"Rising Mist, Rising Moon", Oil on Panel, 12 X16 Inches  SOLD

Wyoming has been our home for over 50 years.  The sense we get from this painting is exactly what we get when we are out in the wild and wooly west.  What impresses me most about this work is the scale and epic feel of the sweep of the horizon and the solitude found when the quietness of the moonrise speaks its piece.

Quietude.  The soft blend of layered colors.  The stillness of the moment when the light of the full moon struggles to find its way through the atmosphere.  The loneliness of the few trees that are found on the high plains.  We visit this place only on occasion... the trees are there always.

This is what the work of EEG is all about:  capturing the moment, the sense of "presence" of the scene before us, that very moment that defines the character of the American west and midwest.  We are often stunned by the surreal qualities of the coming night and smallness of who we are compared to the greatness of the truly great outdoors.  Captured here by EEG.
$1500

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"Approaching Storm on a Kanses Farm", Oil on Panel, 14 X 20 Inches

With an urgancy that fits the subject... much brush work, overlayering of pigments and dramatic color and contrasts, this fine major painting still exhibits the careful draftsmanship that the artist is known for.  The scale of the farm bulidings and trees perfectly set the scale of the painting and creates an image of the smallness of the farm compared with the size of the approaching storm.

Of course, there is much grey in the painting, but each is toned with color, from red to yellow and violet.  It would not be an EEG painting without the inclusion of complementary colors, so the smaller areas of sky become the foil against which the dynamics of color can work their magic.  The overlays of color also make the rays of sunlight look very natural, falling on the scene at the farm and trees.

For anyone who has been in the midwest during a summer storm, this work is easily related to.  The sheer epic scale of the work is sufficient to bring home the feel of such days... where the power of the elements diminish the significance of our own efforts.  This is a fine and noteworthy achievement for Emerson Glass.
$2350

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"Storm on the Plains II", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD

A fine small painting, lush with color and thick juicy paint.  Another of the works that the artist surely had great delight in working on.  The storm clouds are brushed in with great urgency, the rain is falling in sheets and the distant clouds carry a weight of color that is a delight to see.

And yet, it's the color in the distant clouds that capture our attention.  The darkness of the near storm clouds and rain serve as the perfect foil for the bright and brilliantly colored clouds.  The color everywhere is laid on with thick strokes, quickly applied and nicely balanced with primary colors against secondary colors.  The small slivers of sky, painted with yellow and red at the horizon to yellow-green and blue-green in the middle serve their purpose by enhancing the reds and violets of the brightest clouds.  This is the impressionist palette at its finest... complementary colors here and high value contrast there.  A fine work by EEG.
$650

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"Stopping by Wood's on a Snowy Evening", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD

We just couldn't help ourselves in titling this painting... nor for the pun.  And yet, the play on words from the Robert Frost poem goes deeper than just a pun.  These words speak of the artist's viewpoint and contemplation of the profound in even the simplest or most common of subjects:

Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound's the sweep
Of the easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark, and deep,
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.

I'll say no more, as Frost has said it best already... besides, I have miles to go before I sleep... GBT
$650

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"Artist's Life VII" (The Red Bridge), Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches  SOLD

The small colorful bridge that spans a narrow canal and overlooks a pond is more than just a painting of an object... and it goes far beyond the rendering of a night landscape.  The solitude of the night and presence of the figure on the bridge are replete with biographical significance.  We have seen the figure, which represents E E Glass himself, exclusively with the night sky, moon and evening star together in various forms, but always with the sense of a "comfortable solitude".  This is a kind of solitude that brings rest for the soul, an enviable solitude that refreshes rather than isolates.

It has not escaped us that the red of the bridge and lamps is the only red in the painting.  The remainder of the colors all have their parts in supporting the red.  The entirety of the colors demand that we give our attention on the bridge, keeping the subject of the bridge, lamps and the figure entirely in our focus.  The other elements, even the moon, are held in place by their color harmonies, putting the contrasts on the figure on the bridge.  And even there, the darkness of the figure is almost secondary to the color of the bridge.

This is not the first time we have seen the red bridge.  It appears upside down as a reflection in one of the water lily paintings, titled "Reflections:  The Red Bridge" (Oil on Panel, 12 X 12 Inches).  In that painting, we see only the reflections of the bridge and the lamp posts, with no figure.  Nonetheless these two paintings bear remarkable similarities in pathos, and biographical significance.  All of the EEG biographical paintings, which we have titled "Artist's Life", carry the message of solitude.  And while it is obvious that the artist much preferred solitude in his life, there is yet a hint of the yearning for relationships with other people.  It is our belief that the Emerson Glass has achieved that relationship through his paintings.
$850

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"Twilit Peak", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD
"Artist's Life VI" (a biographical work), Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches  SOLD

In these rather startling paintings, the complementary and value contrasts stir us to look again and again.  We can see the subject, that is the last glow of the sun and its reflection off the mountain peaks... but, it's the deep purple shadows that create a sense of mystery and pull us into a scene where we are automatically careful where we step, so we can look into deepening chasm that is totally hidden in shadows.

Emerson Glass had a way of creating new visual perspectives on otherwise rather common subjects.  After all, this is just an ordinary group of rocks, is it not?  Or is it?  Or, could it be an expression of a cathedral, made by color and reflections, light and shadow, or the essence of the mountain west itself?  The artist has a way of requiring us to look with different eyes, to each draw unique conclusions and to find hidden meaning, meant for us and us alone.  Such is the way of EEG, with a new slant on the concept of impressionism.
$650
$950

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"Eye of the Storm", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches  SOLD
"Dark Clouds at Sunset", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches  SOLD

As we have often seen in the west, the greatest threat of storms seems to come with at the time of the setting sun. Granted, the storms are not more fierce at this time, but the approaching darkness is every bit as dramatic as the storm itself.

In these paintings, EEG has offered the depiction of both time of day and an unfolding drama of the storm.  The sun casts its light on the scene, capturing that moment of anticipation.  This is much like the lighting of a stage at the coming of the climax of the story in a play.  All the effects of the story are unfolding in the minds of the audience, even before a single line has been spoken... the accomplishment of drama in the soul before the scene itself is unveiled.

The enjoyment of these paintings is like that... seeing beyond what the story is for the moment, and allowing the mind to explore the possibilities, even before they unfold.  The capturing of such moments is what the great artists of history have done... and also EEG
$850
$850

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"Moonrise at Sleeping Dog Rock", Oil on Canvas, 24 X 36 Inches  SOLD

This is the LAST of the large major paintings from the E E Glass estate... and, if one is to go out with a bang, this is it.  The color is brilliant in the sky and moon, setting the stage for an early evening scene, when the sun is just about down and all is still with the rising full moon.

On a precipitous ridge overlooking the distant mountains sits the area known as "Sleeping Dog Rock".  We know the scene, as it was previously identified in two smaller works of the same subject (see below), and was obviously a favorite of EEG.  He seemed to be most facinated with the small wind blown pine, just to the right of the Rock.  This pine tree is perhaps the most animated of all the trees ever painted by the artist, and which its delicate form has been shaped by the prevailing winds and elements of the Rocky Mountain west.

The presence of several dead trees indicates that this ridge is right at the timberline, where life is precarious, and the trees cling to the rocks and what little soil there is to keep their moisture.  The weight of the snow in winter pushes the trees down, while there is a constant natural struggle between their upward growth toward the sun and the prevailing northwesterly winds.

This work is the culmination of of all that is best in the work of E E Glass:  the quiet moon, the colorful sky and the shredding clouds, as they are driven and tossed by the same winds that shape the trees.  All the color theory fulfillment is here:  the juxtaposition of color complementaries, the play of light and dark and the interesting contrasts of subtle and dramatic.  Arguably the most complete and satisfying of the E E Glass paintings.
$10,000

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RECENTLY RECEIVED IMPRESSIONIST COLOR WORKS:

"Bright Sunset", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD
"Quiet Moonrise on the Plains", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD

These two paintings focus on the pure dynamics of color interaction... the effects of complementary colors as well as the effect of contrasting value (lightness or darkness).  Each speaks mostly of the primary colors of red, yellow and blue, while enhancing them with their complements of green, violet and orange in more subtle ways.

Full narratives are available for these paintings, if you will simply contact us via our online form above, or email us at gbt@gbtate.com.
$650
$650

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"Sunrise at Timberline", Oil on Panel, 8 X 10 Inches  SOLD

When the sun rises in the high altitudes of the Rocky Mountains, the air is so clear and rarefied that the light makes its highest impact.  The intensity of light in the mountain west is so clear that it invades everything it touches.  In this equally intense light filled painting by E E Glass, the light not only touches the rocks and trees, but it also is reflected and bounces around from one side to the other.

The center of attention is, of course, the rising sun itself.  All the rest of the painting is submitted to the sun, either carrying its intensity or hiding from it, like shadows so reluctant to be found.  The overall darkness of the rocks and trees cannot escape the effects of the sun, as the light does reach every corner, even if reflected off another rock.  The light fills the painting.  But, it's the rocks in the immediate area of the sun that frame and define its intensity.  The closer the elements, the more intense they are effected from the light, until the closest elements becomes almost lost by it.

Of course, being a true EEG painting, we again find in it the brilliant use of color theory.  The emerald green of the upper sky is the perfect solution to the overwhelming amount of red and yellow.  Not only does the green add its balance of cool and complementary color, it also acts as a foil to enhance the intensity of the light from the rising sun.  This is a brilliant and purposeful use of color that orchestrates the play of warm and cool, of light and dark, and of drama and calm.  All these factors are satisfied in this exceptional statement of the subject by EEG.
$850

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RECENTLY RECEIVED NIGHT SKY PAINTINGS:

"Night Sky with Falling Star", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD
"Comet Kohoutek", Oil on Panel, 8 X 10 Inches  SOLD
"Starry Night II", Oil on Panel, 8 X 10 Inches  SOLD
"Starry Night with Rising Moon and Falling Star", Oil on Panel, 8 X 10 Inches  SOLD

Here are some wonderful early evening paintings... each with a story to tell.  We have separate narratives for each of them, and if you would like to see them, let us know, and we'll send them to you by email.

There was no other titles to consider for these paintings.  Whether it is the myriad of stars, a falling star, or the glowing comet, each one is unique to itself.  These are celestial works, combining the mystique of the heavenlies with the uniqueness of the color palette of E E Glass.  Each of these works is executed with the layering of colors on top of each other to create the depth of the night skies and set the stage for the main event, either the falling stars or the distant comet.  Each element is carefully crafted, to insure that they properly occupy their spaces, not to overwhelm, but to clothe them with the enveloping night.  The stars are not spattered onto the panel surfaces, but each star carefully set in place and painted individually.  This is done in wonderful random, yet ordered, patterns that reflect the feeling of the real night sky.  The brightest stars have an aura painted around them to enhance their glow.  Such technique requires great patience and diligence in working, to get each one just as the artist purposed.

Each underpainting is different.  One is black, one is deep blue and one is of a honey color.  Each renders a different effect on the overall painting and creates its own impact on the subjects.  In the end, these layers of color give the eyes a great pleasure of reading the depth of the night sky.  Nicely ordered and dramatic works by EEG.
$650

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RECENTLY RECEIVED CLOUD PAINTINGS:

"Shredding Cloudst", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD
"Plains Storm at Sunset", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD
"Rain Storm in the Rockies", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD
"Cloud Color" (Shredding Clouds on a Windy Day), Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD
"Sunset with Dark Storm Approaching", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD
"Night Storm with Full Moon", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD

With an urgency that is demanded by the subjects, these dramatic paintings speak volumes of the feel of their subjects.  Whether it's the setting sun, the rising moon or the shredding clouds, the dramas are clearly depicted.

The brush and palette knife strokes are sure and even dramatic in themselves.  The strokes swirl and dip with the undulations of moving clouds, as well as the rhythm of urgency to capture the moment before it flees our eyes forever.  Such moments might come along but once or twice a year... or a decade.  Such moments grab out attention and require us to stop and consider the scene before us.  We must stop for such displays, as the various elements simpy don't intersect that often.  As often as we see beautiful sunsets, so also with rarity do we see the interplay of drama such as thiese.

The colors are rhythmically orchestrated over and over, like the finest sonatas of Chopin or Beethoven or the dances of Swan Lake.  This is the consumate fulfillment of the impressionist "manifesto".  We tried to capture the pure primary colors in our images, but these works must be seen with your own eyes to experience the pleasure of color interaction.  The end effects are the vibrance of color, even in the darker sections of the paintings, which enhance the drama of the overall scenes even more.
$650

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"Reflections:  The Red Bridge", Oil on Panel, 12 X 12 Inches  SOLD

The more we see of true impressionism in the work of Emerson Glass, the greater our appreciation for the skill required to express such a vision.  In this fine work, there is the total emersion (no pun intended) in the development of the impressionist "manifesto".  Of course, there is no guide book to walk us through the philosophy, nor are there definitions, except those given by the writers who came after the paintings were done and offered their collective judgements according to their own perspectives.

In a sense, we are no different.  We have been handling the work of EEG now for nearly six years, and have had the great priviledge of intimately studying his work for extended periods of time and delving well into the storehouse of artistic excellence provided by the artist.  We have gone lacking only in disappointment... with such a first hand study of work that explores the very depth of the impressionist techniques and methods.  It seem like we occasionally find a work that sums it all up, just like this "Red Bridge".  With the reflections in the water being the only subject, not only does this work offer a totally unique perspective, but it also removes the need for "subject matter" and focuses entirely on the expression of color theory.

The red of the bridge reflection is unique in that it is the only red in the painting.  The artist has deliberately removed red from the entirety of the rest of the painting in such a way, that our eyes go instantly to the bridge without distraction from any other facet.  That the bridge is the center of attention is a given... however, the color distribution in this work literally demands that we give it the attention it deserves.  The result is a statement of complete color theory that places the entire remainder of the painting in a supportive role.  The complement of red is green, and the remainder of the painting is steeped in green, blue-green, yellow-green and olive green, as well as the other two necessary primary colors of blue and yellow.  In such a way, the bridge reflection has become more than just the "subject" of the painting... it becomes the competion of a color statement unparalleled even in the work of the impressionist masters.  I would dare to say that this work is one of the ultimate tools for illustrating the significance of color and its effect on the pleasures of mankind.
$1500

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"Two Cedars in a Quiet Moonrise", Oil on Panel, 14 X 20 Inches  SOLD

This painting approaches the work of the Hudson River School artists of the 19th century in its realism and soft visual effects, and yet this work is all E E Glass.  The color dynamics are all there that define the work of EEG... the playing of primary and secondary colors, the feel of movement against the quietness of the rising moon.

There there is a different story in this painting, in the details and deft handling of paint and fine draftsmanship.  It's as if the artist wants us to stop for a while and see things differently, requiring us to linger long enough to step into the scene and enjoy the moment.  The wind still blows and the clouds still rise, but the workmanship requires us to stop our busy-ness and enjoy the moonrise.

The paint is layered to give luminousity to the scene.  It is underpainted overall with yellow-orange, as a foundation for all that follows.  There are at least two layers of color on top of the underpainting, each to support and illuminate the other.  Not only does this make for exciting color effects, it also softens the entire scene in a way that makes this a very easy painting to live with.  The very techique of color application defines the quietness of the moonrise and paves the way for the soft coming of night, which is very soon to follow.

The "looping" clouds also offer a dynamic of composition in such a way that we don't really think of it in terms of the wind and atmosphere that make them.  Rather, the clouds gently guide our eyes through the painting to keep our focus on the event of the rising moon and cedars growing amongst the rocks.  A truly magnificent and major work by Emerson Glass.
$2350

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"Lavender Clouds", Oil on Panel, 10 X 8 Inches  SOLD

We see this work as a very deliberate expression of the cool spectrum of blues, reds and lavenders by EEG.  It brings out these colors in a way that is well studied and placed perfectly in balance with the warm yellows of the moon and faint reds and yellows of the clouds.  On top of all that is the ultimate color statement... that of bringing lavender to the fore of color expression.

If you will look carefully at the detail images we have provided, you will see the careful layering of colors that produces the medium tones of lavender, repeatedly complementing the other base colors throughout the painting.  The technique, known as scumbling, is one in which the artist first applies a more or less solid underpainting that can either approximate or complement the later layers of color to come on top.  The subsequent color layers are applied carefully with a "dry brush"... that is a brush that is not loaded with pigment, but rather is lightly loaded in such a manner, that when it is dragged over the lower layers, the paint catches the ridges of dried paint and deposits small amounts of fresh color into them.  In this way, the eyes catch both the underpaint and the overlying paints at one time.  The technique sets up a grand vibrancy of color that can either complement or harmonize as they play off each other in a more subtle way than the typical impressionist methods of painting the colors blatently side by side.

These methods are those of the old masters, as well as the impressionists.  It is purely the whim of the artist to decide which colors to lay on top of each other and therefore the nature of the luminosity that results.  The color effects are endless in possibilities, as often layer upon layer reflect off each other.  In examining the edges of this painting, we find one or two layers of white gesso for the foundation, a toning underpainting of yellow-orange, and then at least two subequent layers of color ranging from purple and blue-gray to brighter teal, blue-lavender, red and red-yellow.  In any case, the final result is a clear and vibrant work that is a clear expression of color theory as well as of old master techniques.  A beautifully executed work by EEG.
$650

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"Blazing Sunrise", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD
"Sunset & Spruce", Oil on Panel, 11 X 14 Inches  SOLD

Blazing Sunrise... yes, but blazing color, blazing dramatic effects, blazing visual impact.  We could have titled this wonderful small painting by any of these superlatives.  In fact, some paintings (like this one) are better worked in the small size, since the visual impact is so great.  It's hard to image anything making a greater color impact than this work.

The reds and yellows of this brilliant work interplay and resolve into each other over and again with layers of color applied one over the other.  The final effect is that of a vibrant and luminous painting that endlessly echos and reverberates the very essence of the sunrise.

Incidently, we say "sunrise" simply because that is our first impression of this painting... not sunset.  Perhaps it's the quietude of the whole scene that speaks of early morning.  Perhaps it's simply that we have the pleasure of titling most of these EEG paintings, and that is what we chose.  In any case, we know that this small work speaks volumes in the area of color, which is the ultimate goal of the impressionist painters anyway, is it not?   A complete statement by E E Glass, and a completely satisfying painting, done in the finest of technique and style.
$650

$950

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"Ghosts of the Rocky Mountains", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches  SOLD

We just couldn't help ourselves in titling this painting, as the metaphors are simply too good to resist.  The spirit of the west is often told in stories around the campfires, even from the earliest settlers just about anywhere west of the Mississippi River.  When men and women came west, the mysteries of the west often seemed to unfold before them... in the vastness of the plains to the heights of the Rockies themselves.  The very solidness of the mountains seemed to speak of infathomable conquests when the winds howled around the rocks and trees, adding an air of greater mystery as the shadows gathered around the settlers of a new land.

The spririt of the west was well said by Louis L'Amour... "Once, in the night, awakened by some small sound, I lay for a time.  Overhead I saw a great horned owl go sweeping down some mysterious channel of the night, piloted by I know not what lust, what urge, what hidden drive.  Was it simply that, like me, he loved the forest night and liked to carve his velvety paths among the dark columns of the spruce?"
"I am one with these creatures of the night and of the high places.  Like them, I love the coolness, the nearness of the stars, the sudden outthrusts of rock that fall into the unbelievable vastness below."
"Like them, sometimes I think I have no sense of time, no knowledge of years, only the changing of the seasons, but not the counting of them.  And then I was asleep again and awake with the faint grayness of the morning" (spoken by William Tell Sackett in Louis L'Amour "Treasure Mountain").

What more can be said?
$850

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"Artist's Life #4" (Painting by moonlight and lantern on a lonely ridge), Oil on Panel, 12 X 12 Inches  SOLD
"Artist's Life #5" (Vignette of Artist's Life #4), Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches  SOLD

These works, above all others, exemplify the artist's life and work on the high and lonely ridges of the Rocky Mountains.  In the dark and on an isolated ridge, the artist is going about his work, likely as was his normal working methods... getting the fullness of the light of the moon, and using a lantern to light his path of drawing or painting.

It is worth noting that the artist has found a bit of a shelter from the wind amongst the rocks and bannered pines.  That the wind is a factor is obvious from the shape of the trees and the movement of the clouds under the full moon.  Men who frequent the mountains always keep an eye out for such places, even if they have no need for them at the moment.  One remembers these for the next time he is near and in need of shelter from a storm or cold.

We easily get the feel of the place and time in these works.  The time because of the darkness and position of the moon, and the place by the movement of the clouds and sense of isolation in the rocks and trees.  It's as if we can feel the wind on our cheeks... and we settle down to huddle against the elements.  A wonderful presence of both mind and location by EEG.
$1150

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"Looping Clouds", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD
"Viridian Moonrise", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches  SOLD

I often think of the work of Claude Monet when I see these EEG paintings.  Both artists were striving for color expressions that go beyond the mere painting of a scene or object.  They were looking for startling and satisfying color combinations.  As the art teacher John Carlson said... "if you don't see lovely color mixed on the palette, I doubt if you'll see lovely color on the painting".  Profoundly put, Mr. Carlson, and both EEG and Monet painted the same scenes over and over, using "lovely color" to achieve their desired effects.

In "Looping Clouds", the rising moon finds its own color, the last glow of daylight dramatically colors the clouds with reds and violets.  These complement the greens, blue-greens and deeper blues of the sky, and create a wonderful luminosity that resonates throughout the painting.  Even in its somewhat small size, these color effects stand well alone in a fully mature color statement.  A fine impressionist work by Emerson Glass.

On the back of  "Viridian Moonrise" are written three words:  "Viridian" and "Prussian Blue".  We have only rarely seen notations on the backs of EEG paintings, so I think it wise to give these attention and consider if there is greater or deeper meaning than simply a notation of colors.  On some of the finest of the work of Emerson Glass, we have found color notes on the back.  These appear to indicate a desire to remember or go back to the specific use of colors to achieve what the artist desired.  In this case, the notations surely bear significance, in that we have seen some of his best work with the blue-green sky predominating.
$650

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"Night Storm Clearing, with Full Moon and Stars", Oil on Panel, 11 X 14 Inches  SOLD

Startling.  Dramatic.  Colorful.  These are only the first of the descriptive words to come to mind.  This is a work of first-class contrasts in every way.  The color theory is clicking on all cylinders, with blue against its complement orange, green against its complement red and the lightness of the yellows set against the darkness of the deepest blues.  In fact, the underlying color is a cool violet-blue, that comes out with the overlying color of a warm green-blue.  These combine in a most subtle but profound way, creating a very deep and impressive sky.  The sky, in turn, acts as a foil for the moon and several stars.

These contrasts in addition, set up the drama of the subject itself... the passing storm clouds and the reflection of the unseen setting sun on the tops fo the highest clouds and cloud shreds that both hide and enhance the full moon.  Even though the composition is simple, the interplay of the various color contrasts make for a work of a deceptively complex expression of color theory.  If you put your hand over one area of this painting to block it out, the rest of the work begins to fall apart.  Each element of the painting is that significant, and none can possibly be omitted without adversely affecting the whole.

This is a fine expression of the best of the elements we have come to love about Emerson Glass.  Even the last light we find on the horzon takes on great impact and significance that perfectly balances the whole composition.  Looking back on some of the smaller works we have had over the years, we see that each has been one more link in a long chain of study that is consummated in this painting.  A major and culminating work by EEG.
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"Emerald Sky" (Vignette), Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD
"Emerald Sky", Oil on Panel, 10 X 14 Inches  SOLD

These painting were done in the more traditional sense, in that they are more "realistic".  The rendering of each element is carefully and skillfully executed.  The tree and rocks are beautifully crafted.  In my mind, the combination of violet in the clouds is a stroke of genius.  Rather than work the obvious complementary, which would be pure red against the green, the color is modified toward violet to ease into the color theory rather than blast away with both barrels.  This particular combination mades both the sky and the clouds "believable"... that is to say, to tend toward natural, despite the obvious impossibilities.

Will we ever see a sky like this one?... probably not.  Yet again, who knows?  Yellow-green, green, blue-green, blue, violet... it goes on and on.  Obviously, these works are about color.  The landscape is simply the vehicle to carry the color combinations that the artist wanted to put together.  The end effect is a smashing volley of color combinations that simply speak for themselves.

Color.  As I contemplate the philosophy of the impressionist artists, it all makes sense.  Why not push the limits of color theory?  Why not express an artwork according to the urges of one's own sense of color "daring" rather than the expectations of the salon?  Interesting question that began with the French impressionists.  Food for thought.
$650

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"A Break in the Storm" (Kansas Farm), Oil on Panel, 10 X 14 Inches  SOLD

If one is looking for drama in the work of EEG, look no further.  Executed with a very real sense of urgency, this work was done largely in "black & white", capturing the the essence of the storm on the plains of Kansas.  The clouds swirl and rise in abundance, as if rising from the very ground.  The focal point is the brilliantly lit middle ground clouds and farm at the center of the painting, while the storm rages all around.  The black clouds are shredding as they rise, swirling in response to the wind one can almost feel in this painting.

One thing that gets your attention immediately is the scale of the subject.  Dispite the size of the painting, the emensity of the storm clouds is easily grasped against the size of the farm, which is dwarfed in comparison.  It is vulnerable in the scale and visual impact of the storm, so that it is easy to understand the fearsome power of such storms as they sweep across the the midwest.

There is actually no "black" in this painting, nor even in the underpainting.  The darks are made up of mixtures, most likely blue and deep earth reds, some areas tending toward the reds and others toward the blue.  These colors interact in subconscience ways to achieve the dynamic color effects that the artist is known for.  However, it is the "value" of the colors (the relative lightness/darkness) that make for the drama, rather than pure color interactions... once again revealing the mastery of Emerson Glass in the use of these visual devices.  A memorable and dramatic work by EEG.
$950

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"Shooting Star in a Blazing Sunset", Oil on Panel, 10 X 14 Inches (Circa early 1960's)  SOLD

We traded back for this fine early work, the first major painting of the subject that we originally sold years ago.  The "star" of the show (no pun intended) of course is the great blazing sunset, so dramatically and colorfully presented.  A look at the detail images of this painting will reveal the dynamics of color application and brilliant effects of the setting sun.

This work is also a remarkable example of the impressionist theory and techniques.  Virtually all of the painting is done in primary colors (red, yellow and blue), with only a small smattering of the one secondary color, violet.  In their proper places, the primary colors of red and yellow are each painted in full strength, making for vibrant effects as well as a strong focal point.  The crescent moon and evening star are quiet with a soft glow all their own, yielding the stage to the falling star and sunset.

The falling star subject has always been a great favorite of ours.  The drama of both color and motion fills this work with an epic sense, as if the artist was recording the beginning of time itself.  This work is a prime example of the early work of Emerson Glass.
$950

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"Water Lilies VII", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD

Vibrant.  Radiant.  Colorful.  The subject is perfect for the artist, giving him the opportunity to explore all the nuances of color and their interactions.  The results are paintings that resonate with with color and energy.  The reflections in the water cause the color to echo back and forth in resounding fashion.

The artist was obviously influenced by the work of French impressionist, Claude Monet (1840 - 1926).  In conversations with the widow, Nina Glass, she said that her husband was deeply impacted by the work of other artists, sometimes literally to tears.  The water lily paintings of Monet are legendary and considered the most important of his work. The same locations were painted repeatedly under different light conditions and times of day, ultimately achieving an abstract feel that helped to usher in later modern movements like abstract expressionism.

In this work, EEG has taken his normal palette of colors to a different form of expression, one that has similar abstract qualities to those of Monet.  The palette is bolder than that of Monet, but the results are similar, as the greater strength of color is more acceptable in its smaller size... and yet the visual impact is much the same.  In due course the comparisons with Monet will have their way in art history.  Excellence will always have its own results as well as its own rewards.
$650

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"Fireworks II", Oil on Panel, 8 X 6 Inches  SOLD

A sterling and natural subject matter for Emerson Glass... the invasion of the night sky by the rockets, flares and fireworks on a dark and moonless night.  In this fine work, the only evident color is that of the fireworks and their resulting clouds of smoke, reflecting the glare of pops and whizzes.  Nothing else.

So, where is the blue, you ask?  It's there in the deeply rendered sky that appears black, but is actually a very deep blue, blue-green and blue-violet.  The color is so dark and subtle, that it almost eludes the viewer.  Almost.  It's there and it's there in spades... there is no "black" in this painting, save for the underpainting that serves beautifully as the foundation of the work underneath the scene itself.

This is a fine and powerfully vibrant work.  The fireworks jump out at you with a presence and texture that can be seen in the detail images.  The stark contrast of the deep blue background and the brilliance of the fireworks speaks volumes, even in this small size.  The work has a luminosity that fits the subject matter, and enough energy to make it work.  A marvelous work by EEG.
$650

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"Fireworks on a Moonless Night", Oil on Panel, 12 X 9 Inches  SOLD

Once again, a drama in the night sky finds a vibrant expression in the work of Emerson Glass.  Literally a burst of light... the night being redefined by the popping of fireworks, and the three primaries (red, yellow and blue) take center stage.  The drama of light is ever present in the work of EEG, and particularly here with the deepest blue sky acting as a backdrop for the brilliant fireworks.

But more than just dramatic explosions.  This painting also contains the essence of the impressionists:  the defining of the subject matter with color alone.  According to the impressionsit "manifesto", the visual impact of any one color is heightened by placing it in close relationship with its compliment.  In this case, the reds of the center bursts are heightened by the close proximity of green, the compliment of red.  The eyes tend to reinterpret this juxtaposition and perceive a kind of luminosity that just the colors by themselves cannot provide.  On top of this, the light/dark relationship of the exploding fireworks against the rich darkness of the sky acts like spotlights cast on a stage where actors of a drama are set to action.  Even the last glow of the setting sun has the same energy as the fireworks themselves.

Here is new subject matter for Emerson Glass that we have not seen before.  Nonetheless, this work is simply a natural extension of the artist's night paintings, be it of rockets or shooting stars.  The end effect is the same... the ultimate drama defined by color and light.  A striking work by a master of color theory and its effects on the minds of men.
$850

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"Kansas Moonrise", Oil on Panel, 10 X 14 Inches  SOLD

We have seen very few Kansas paintings, and this is one of the best we have seen yet of them.  Sometimes the moon will be rising, and we are hardly even aware of it.  Have you ever been chatting with someone and suddenly they say, "Look!  The moon is coming up!"?  Before that, we were hardly conscious of the moon's presence.  Well, at first glance of this painting, we might say the same thing.

The moon is half hidden by the distant trees, and easy to overlook with only a quick glance.  But, just as on any evening with the rising moon, we suddenly stand in awe of it's presence, and that in such a tangible way.  It's like one can reach out with very little effort and touch it.  Out in the west, we would say "dab a loop on that paloose and haul'er in".  We just might do that with this painting.

The setting sun is quite evident in the long streaks of light touching the grass and in the brilliantly colored clouds that are shredding with the fading of day.  The atmosphere is just a bit hazy, the distant trees fading to a reddish violet.  It is no small coincidence that the color of these trees is a violet that is a compliment to the yellow of the moon.  This gives the moon an enhanced brilliance and glow of its own.

The rest of the scene is filled with greens.  There are the teal greens of the upper sky and the dark greens and browns of the trees... which are all perfect compliments to the reds, yellows and violets found in the sky and small pond in the foreground.  The large trees on the left give the scene its sense of scale and helps to push the rest of the painting back in space.
$1250

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"Pink Rose", Oil on Panel, 8 X 6 Inches  SOLD

I call this a "what if" kind of painting.  That is, we have heard many times the question "what if that 'abstract' artist could really paint or draw?"  So, as if to answer such critics, Emerson Glass did this fine small painting, just to show that he is an impressionist by choice, not because he couldn't draw or paint in the academic style.

This is a very pleasant work, one that speaks volumes beyond the presentation of one simple rose.  This work demonstrates both the artist's ability to draft well, but also he saw colors well in the process.  An academically sound painting, this simple rose has the compliments in it, just as all his landscapes do.  The background if a very deep blue, the rose is pink, red and red-orange, and the rest of the supporting elements are green and yellow... all this rounds out the trio+ of primary colors and sets the vision of the impressionist into an othewise academic work.

Typical of EEG artwork, he emphsizes the simple.  More often, it is a single wind shaped pine or cedar amonst a group of rocks, or the reflection of the moon in a group of water lilies.  Here, it is just the one rose.  Simple.  Direct.  Done.  And in the process, EEG once again shows that he is capable of mastering any method or subject matter.
$450

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"Rising Moon with Clearing Skies", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD

Even in the small paintings, the artist shows a "Sandzen-esque" quality that belies its size.  In this colorful work, the skies are clearing after a rain while the moon rises half-hidden by the passing clouds.  The dynamics of color very much reflect the work of Sandzen, with much contrasting color to create both harmonies and contrasts.

This is a quiet work, reflective of the feeling one has after the storm has passed... a time when we can take a deep breath, take in the moment while the air is so fresh from the rain and we can relax from whatever work we were involved in.  The distant mountains have a solid quality that contrasts with the fleeting clouds.  The large cottonwood tree likewise stands solidly as if to proclaim that is has stood yet another test of the elements.

A fine work by EEG.  A work that finds its experession in color and in mood, speaking of the proper place it belongs, both in the nature of the scene as well as the nature of the mood.  We can stand by both in times of challenges.
$450

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"Flaming Yellow Rose", Oil on Panel, 8 X 6 Inches  SOLD

Claude Monet is often called "the father of abstract expressionism".  And so he was.  He was a pioneer in his own time and a forerunner of later movements.  That influence was simply a natural outgrowth of his work, especially in the water lily paintings.  Now we come full circle again with these "first time" works by Emerson Glass... the first flower paintings we have ever seen by the artist.  Also a "first time" is the vertical format, which we have not encountered before.

This dynamic work goes far beyond the mere trappings of impressionism.  This painting literally explodes with an abundance of color, and transcending the rose into into a flame of fire.  It was no mere accident that the color of the rose is the color of fire.  However, every aspect of this work solicits the abstract, even the stem and leaves.

The rose seems to be fully illuminated by its own light, and every other element of the painting serves as a platform for it with either dark or muted color.  The rose emerges out of the darkness of the blue and deep purple background like a light in the darkness.  An immensely stark and dramatic work by EEG.
$450

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"Shimmering Flowers", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches  SOLD

What do you see when you take a close look at one of the painting of Emerson Glass?  I mean a close intimate look.  Paint.  That answer seems simple enough, but isn't that the essence of all painting?  The artist applies his craft with a desire to create something that will bring you back again and again, ask questions and desire to look deeper.

The is the first flower painting we have ever seen by EEG.  I hope it's not the last.  We gave this work the title of "Shimmering Flowers" for a reason:  this work vibrates everywhere and in every manner.  There is very little wasted effort in an attempt to make the flowers look "real".  Instead, the color is everything.  The shimmer has been achieved by the constant movement of the color through the artist's use of the palette knife and the over-abundant supply of pigment.

EEG has taken a page from the work and writings of Vincent van Gogh.  In his letters to Theo, van Gogh often spoke of his condition... but the remedy to whatever difficulty was always the same... the expression of color, the achieving of a breakthrough in his vision and technique.  Like van Gogh, EEG has addressed his condition with a kind of pathos.  He relates to his condition, but never in despair.  In discussions with the artist's widow, Nina Glass, she never once even hinted at any regret over the life she and EEG lived together.  Rather, it was with greatest affection that she could remember a life of fulfillment, a life lived in reflection of the grace of God expressed in all that they had and did together.

I trust you will look long and drink deeply from the well of color of this painting.  There is much to be found here, and satisfactions that go beyond a simple still life.
$650

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"Water Lilies IX" (Reflections of the Moon and Evening Star), Oil on Panel, 14 X 20"  SOLD

Impressionism is all about color, and this major painting by Emerson Glass is the ultimate expression of the impressionist philosophy.  The rich and bold colors of the moon, sky and evening star reflected in the water are perfectly complimented by the dark and neutral colors of the reflected trees.  The color of the tree reflections are almost neutral, although generally of a blue-purple-gray that remains well in the background and complimented to the sky colors, giving the sky its due significance.  This is very important as a statement of the vision of Emerson Glass.

The beauty of this painting is in the greens... the bold tangible greens of the lilies against the light ethereal greens of the reflected sky.  It's the greens that bring the transition of the yellows to the blue-violets.  These greens are what tie the painting all together, binding the lilies to the deep background sky.  What a delight in color these are!

The moon is large, but it is the always significant evening star that has taken on an even more important role in this composition.  The star is emphasized, not only in its placement and size, but moreso in its perfect compliment of color in the yellows and greens against the blue-violet of the lower sky.  These factors all play together in a harmony of the whole to allow us to focus on the background every bit as much as the water lilies themselves in the foreground.

Then there is, of course, the water lilies.  In the finest tradition of the impressionists, this work embraces the subject of nature in its own unique way.  The major departure of the work of EEG from that of the French forerunners is the much greater boldness and freshness of color in his work.  EEG did not copy the impressionists, but rather learned from their philosophies and combined them with his own style and working methods to bring a stunning and vibrant expression to the art world that has not been seen before.  This is a rare commodity in the marketplace today, where it seems that copies and imitations of the work of others is rampant.

I must confess that what I see in this work is history in the making.  In all of the EEG water lily paintings, there is a definite move away from the work of history and a move toward the artist making a history of his own.  This is a quality that is most rare of all in the art marketplace... true originality thrust in the face of tradition.  Boldness in more ways than one.
$2,650

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"Rising to the Last Light", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches  SOLD

With an urgency that fits the subject of the flying clouds, Emerson Glass has created a marvelous abstract design that speaks much more than just the subject.  In this work, the artist has determined that there would be a concentration of color at the center of the composition, while all the rest plays up to it.  This is accomplished by the much darker surrounding colors, as well as their neutrality in comparison to the brilliant reds and yellows.

The clouds are rising from the shadows of the earth into the very last vestige of light found from the setting sun.  It is clear that this is the last hoorah of light, the last gasp before the sun is gone for the night.  The very dark of the sky speaks of the time of nightfall, setting the state for the drama that is depicted in the rising clouds.  Of note also is that the dark blue of night has a slight greenish cast to is... the foil against which the reds and yellows of the clouds finds their perfect compliment.

The color applications are very urgent... quick slashes of color, as if the artist was desperate to get what he could while the moment was still with him, before it faded quickly into the night itself.  This work is in every sense the capturing of just a fleeting moment in time and space.
$750

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"Rising Clouds with Twisted Cedar", Oil on panel, 7 X 10 Inches  SOLD
"Rising Moon with Twisted Cedar", Oil on panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD

Louis L'Amour wrote:  "He liked the wind in the grass himself.  And the cedars too, and the smell of them.  He wondered if the writer of that note had ever really looked at a cedar.  Gnarled, twisted by wind, rooted often enough in rock, still it lived and grew.  It took a sight of living and hardship to grow like that. But then when they did grow, they grew strong and they lasted.  Why, he'd see cedars that had split rocks apart, cedars that must have been old before Columbus landed."  (Louis L'Amour, "Conagher")

We must remember what it took to actually get to the places where such work could be produced.  Long hikes were ever before him.  Steep slopes and many obstacles were there to be negotiated.  Harsh weather and other dangers had to be accounted for.  EEG faced the same conditions as the trees, if only for a short while, just to get a small handful of pencil drawings.  These would later be turned into paintings that represented the feel and sense of place where the artist lived his life.

I desperately hope that lovers of the work of Emerson Glass do not take for granted the struggle and challenges represented in his work.  We don't know how high or how long it took the artist to reach these ridges with their lone cedar trees... but we do know that finding these places did not come easy or cheap.  What's even more remarkable is that the artist did so, knowing that his work would likely never been seen in the art world, nor would they likely receive any such notoriety as they enjoy today.

Most of all, I want to thank every one of you who take the time to look, to find the care and diligence of one artist who did what he was called to do, despite the great odds against fame or monetary rewards.  Thank you for appreciating the work of Emerson Glass.
$750

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"Approaching Storm" (Gully Washer), Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches  SOLD
"Night Fire" (Wildfire under a Full Moon), Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches  SOLD

Urgency from top to bottom... the FEEL of the storm rather than an academic record of it... this is the task of Emerson Glass in this surprising and dramatic painting.  As the eminent threat of the storm is on us, so are the dynamics of the brush strokes and palette knife.  We have seen other paintings by EEG of the subject, but this one carries that "now" factor, the sense that, not only is the storm on the way, but that it is here and now upon us.

Only the slim thread of the horizon in the lower left allows us a glimpse of what is fading.  It is the realization that no storm lasts forever, and this too shall pass.  It's only those who understand this that can truly last out the storms of life, allow the rain to fall, but run off their backs like that of a duck.  Forgive me if I was poetic.

This is a startling painting with drama that belies its size.  The predominant reds and yellows are complimented by the very dark greys... the color of charcoal, the color of darkness, the color of the back-lit stage.  A marvel by Emerson Glass.

Even greater drama... with every aspect of this work bringing attention to the fire itself.  The fire is raging on a high ridge in the mountains, with other fires raging in the far distant ranges.  The brilliance of the fire is emphasized by the dark and subdued colors all around it, many of them complements of the reds and yellows of the fire, making them even more intense.

But wait!... there's more!  In the presence of the drama of the fire is the calm of a night defined by the quiet moon and the evening star.  Here we again have the profound biographical notations of the artist's life.  Even the background sky is painted "quietly"... that is, it is done wholly in brush with very little texture in order to remain where and what it is meant to be.  The quietude of the moon and star speak of the attitude toward their circumstances of EEG and his wife, Nina in the midst of drama all around them.  They remain aloof and undisturbed by the rages of the fire, a unique symbolism in itself in the life of Emerson Glass.  His story is painted in one fell swoop of this work, a compete statement of the artist's life.
$950

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"Dusk" (A Biographical Notation), Oil on Panel, 7 X 10 Inches  SOLD

When the sun is setting, the whole earth takes on a subtle warmth that seems to make the land hold on tightly to the last light.  If you have ever been in the Rocky Mountains at such a time, that sense never leaves you.  It's not just a "Kodak moment", but a feeling that grabs your heart and refuses to let go until you acknowledge that this place and moment is forever a part of you.  That is the essence of the west.

The red sky lowers to a subtle purple and the crescent moon and evening star declare their own presence.  These contrast beautifully with the greens of the trees and grass, the colors being the compliments of the reds and red-violets of the sky and rocks.  Such contrasts are what keep an artwork alive and interesting.  They draw the viewer into the scene at the focal point, and then give them the pleasure of discovering the details of such a simple scene.

Of personal interest is the biographical "handwriting" that EEG is so well known for.  It's most interesting that the rocks seem to point at the moon and the wind bannered pines point to the evening star.  We know that so often in the artist's work, that the evening star is a biographical notation for his wife, Nina.  It's the bent and torn trees that bring our attention to her.  But it's the solid rocks that bring our attention to the moon, always a biographical notation for the artist himself.  These are no small accidents in this composition.  The connection of the moon to the rocks speaks of the man's role in his home, while the connection of the bent trees and evening star speak of both the frailty as well as the strength of the man's wife.  Like I said... no small bit of symbolism... and done toward the end of the artist's life gives this work an even more poignant impact.  A fine and complete statement of the life and work of E E Glass.
$750

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"The Artist's Life IV" (Warmth at Twilight), Oil on Panel, 16 X 18 Inches  SOLD

A major painting, and perhaps the most revealing of them all, in the biographical sense.  Here we find the artist sitting at the campfire at the end of the day, on a high altitude rocky ridge by a pond.  The dog is his only companion this night, as it has been on occasion in the artist's work.

Of interest is the moon, hidden in the scene above where the artist rests, but revealed in the water's reflections near the bottom.  The presence of the moon is unmistakable, as are the few stars that are shown, also in the lowest reflections.  The only night light showing is the one evening star... the most poignant reminder of Nina Glass, always so obvious in the artist's thoughts.

This is the coming night, the dark reflections in the water even as the sun is down at the horizon, unseen behind the vantage point but revealed in its reflections of color in the trees and rocks.  The lone figure is our constant reminder of the life that Emerson Glass chose, where he found contentment in the solitude of the high isolated ridges of the Rocky Mountains... where he found the fulfillment of his purpose.  A major biographical statement by E E Glass.
$2,350

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"Water Lilies VIII" (Deep Waters), Oil on Panel, 18 X 18 Inches  SOLD

A major painting.  This work is the culmination of many of the other water lily paintings we have seen... a work that expresses all that is in color theory.  The reflections in the water are brought to the very limits of color exercise, by transcending from the reds and yellows of the reflected sunset to the blues, blue-greens, and violet-purples of the coming night sky.  The yellow of the moon and evening star is deliberately placed among its compliment, purple.  The reds and yellows of the sunset are placed deliberately among the greens and neutral purples of the trees.  Over all these are placed the greens of the lily pads and their compliment, the bright reds of the lilies themselves.  But the reds of the lilies are different from the reds of the sunset.  The red lilies are of a cool nature tending toward violet, while the reds of the sunset are warm, tending toward orange and yellow.

This is the stuff that the impressionists are made of:  color used in such a way that the exercise of color theory is in its full bloom (no pun intended).  The greens of the lily pads are many, from vibrant blue-green to dull olive green.  These all speak of "green", but taken in the whole, blend into one statement that says it all of what the earthy growth was created to be.

What all this means to the viewer of art is this... that here is the sheer exuberance of color and the enjoyment of the most vibrant and resonant expressions of the impressionist art form.  It's the impressionists that brought the dynamics of color theory to the attention of the art world.  They ended forever the thought that painting had to represent the world in a realistic narrative, and established a new focus on the sheer pleasure of enjoying color for what it was meant to be.

Exactly such a work is this fine water lily painting by Emerson Glass.  This painting is all that impressionism has been meant to be for the souls of men.
$2,800

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"Lamp Post", Oil on Panel, 8 X 8 Inches

Once again, the biographical references are replete in this painting.  The lamp post and the empty bench both speak of the artist's life.  The lamp post is one of the "lesser lights" in the works with those words in the title.  Nonetheless, the comfort given by such lamps can never be overstated.  The light provides a measure of safety, a measure of companionship of a sort and a measure of beauty to the life of all.  Light dispells the darkness, turning the coldness of night into a thing of warmth, much like "Nighthawks" that we have referenced before by Edward Hopper.

The empty bench is much a biographical reference in the work of EEG.  We have seen it occupied by a figure of the artist, as a place of contemplation of his life and work.  We have seen it as a symbol of isolation, but not despair.  In the glow of the lamp post, the bench beckons the artist to come and sit, meditate and recharge the batteries of his life.  The bench is more a symbol of hope for his own future than anything else.

This wonderfully dark painting is still full of light.  Light in the form of a waning sky and a glowing lamp post.  All of this speaks of hope, even with the coming of darkness.  Forgive me if I wax poetic... but the more one sees the work of Emerson Glass, the greater his sympatico with the artist, his life and his work.  Such works as this one most of all.
$650

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"Reflections of a Lesser Light I" (Lamp Post), Oil on Panel, 8 X 8 Inches  SOLD
"Reflections of a Lesser Light II" (Water Lilies), Oil on Panel, 8 X 8 Inches  SOLD

"And God made two great lights; the greater light to rule the day, and the lesser light to rule the night: he made the stars also." (Genesis 1:16)

If the work of an impressionist is to express color, then it is also to express light.  The titles of these two paintings are replete with meaning.  The "lesser light" refers to the moon, according to scripture.  It's interesting to note that the lesser light is that which reflects the real light, but is not the light itself.  The sun is its own light, as are the stars.  If we carry the analogy a bit further, we can say Emerson Glass refers to himself as the moon, reflecting Him who is greater.  And yet, as we have always perceived, the evening star in his work has biographical significance as the artist's wife, Nina who, though smaller, carries her own light.  Let it not escape us that his wife was blind (food for thought).

In the first of the two paintings, there is also the lamp post.  In other works that have a lamp post in it, there are huge biographical implications of solitude, but not of despair.  The lamp is a source of its own light and represents civilization, but always at a distance, never up close.  More food for thought.

Now we see that color is also a carrier of light.  Each color represents a portion of the spectrum, and if they could all be combined into a cohesive whole, would complete the color spectrum to produce white light.  But... on a painting, the colors are also reflected light, not light itself.  More food for thought.

These two works have great luminosity, with different sources of light.  These (also considering the complementary colors) create a vibrancy that is both in the objects and their reflections.  And so we come full circle... with the presentation of color and light that resonates with each other.  As we see it, this is the very essence of great impressionist painting... and also the essence of Emerson Glass.
$650

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"Moon and Shredded Clouds in a Deep Blue Sky", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD

Another old friend literally takes to the skies.  The expression of the moon and clouds in the night sky is always a recurring theme in the work of EEG.  In this case the exploration of the deepest blues and the effects of its complement, orange (composed here in mixtures of red and yellow), and all on a black underpainting, adding depth.

This work is a masterwork of the three primaries red, yellow and blue.  The moon is intensly yellow, and the reds likewise... ah, but it's the blues that make this work what it is.  If you will take in the blue, it's there to enjoy.  The deepest blue is combined with blue-violet and  blue-purple to give it its own vibrancy and keeps it from fading into a dull and listless void.  This reveals that even the deepest colors can have a luminosity of their own.  In this case the deep reaches of space come alive with a kind of presence that only such color mastery can provide.  And in the midst of the sky is the evening star of pale yellow that shines because of its brightness as well as the complementary aspect that yellow has to purple.
$550

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"Rising Moon over Deep Blue Waters", Oil on Panel, 14 X 20 Inches  SOLD

The great impressionists all seemed to have returned to the same subject matter time and again.  Like his works of the Rouen Cathedral or water lilies, it has been recorded that Monet had a craving for the nuances of color in a subject that appeared under different lighting conditions.  It is obvious that EEG had the same kind of craving.  Here we find another old friend:  the mountain lake, the bannered pines and the rising moon.

The colors are more harmonious than other compositions of the same scene, and yet they are more intense at the same time.  We titled this work as we did because of the depth of the color in the water... from deep blue to blue-violet to purple, augmented by the lighter reds, yellows and greens of the sky.  There is something attractive about the interplay of the green against the deeper blue and violet.  These are not exactly complementary colors, but are closely related.  The end result is a kind of a rich color mixture that is defined by harmony rather than contrast.

Nina Glass once made the interesting statement that her husband did not like to be called a "landscape painter".  If we look at this work in the light of that statement, we see that this painting is actually an interpretation of a moment in time, caught in colors interpreted by the impressionist mind.  This work is a depiction of a bright mood, highlighted by the focus of the rising moon, that ultimately relaxes the viewer despite a scene that shows much evidence of the prevailing winds and other elements that have shaped the landscape.  The same sense of mood can be found in all the artist's paintings.  Which is why we never get tired of seeing the same subjects, each with its own statement in its own moment in time.

So overall, we must look at this painting as a complete statement of its own, a declaration of what was important to the artist... of how he sought so diligently to find the essence of his life's work, and translate that into a language that will speak to every generation.  In my own opinion, EEG succeeded much beyond his wildest expectations.
$2800

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"Water Lilies VI" (Early Evening), Oil on Panel, 8 X 8 Inches  SOLD
"Water Lilies V" (Biography), Oil on Panel, 10 X 14 Inches  SOLD
"Water Lilies IV" (Three Lamp Posts), Oil on Panel, 10 X 14 Inches  SOLD
"Water Lilies III" (Vignette - Moon and Evening Star), Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD
"Water Lilies II" (Moon and Evening Star Reflect on the Water), Oil on Panel, 12 X 12 Inches  SOLD
"Water Lilies I" (Sunset on a Pond), Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches  SOLD

Vibrant.  Radiant.  Colorful.  These are the first water lily paintings we have ever seen by Emerson Glass.  The subject is perfect for the artist, giving him the opportunity to explore all the nuances of color and their interactions.  The results are paintings that resonate with with color and energy.  The reflections in the water cause the color to echo back and forth in resounding fashion.

The artist was obviously influenced by the work of French impressionist, Claude Monet (1840 - 1926).  In conversations with the widow, Nina Glass, she said that her husband was deeply impacted by the work of other artists, sometimes literally to tears.  The water lily paintings of Monet are legendary and considered the most important of all his work. The same locations were painted repeatedly under different light conditions and times of day, ultimately achieving an abstract feel that helped to usher in later modern movements.

In this work, EEG has taken his normal palette of colors to a different form of expression, one that has similar abstract qualities to those of Monet.  The palette is bolder than that of Monet, but the results are similar, as the greater strength of color is more acceptable in its smaller size... and yet the visual impact is much the same.  In due course the comparisons with Monet will have their way in art history.  Excellence will always have its own results as well as its own rewards.

NOTE (Water Lilies IV):  The night has deepened in color with the last of the light of day and the setting of the crescent moon.  The brightest light comes from the lamps, which are lit for the coming night, and their intensity is not matched even by the glow of the setting sun.  The subdued greens of the spruce trees are clearly defined while the crescent moon shimmers on the surface of the pond.

NOTE (Water Lilies V):  We almost missed it... did you?  In the upper middle of the painting is a self portrait of the artist, sitting on a bench with the dog by his side.  Once again we find a work that is filled with EEG's autobiography in the most unusual way.  The figure is a mere reflection in the composition filled with the artist's typical elements, creating an intriguing story of its own.

NOTE (Water Lilies VI):  Another color variant.  The red of the sunset is removed and replaced with yellow, yellow-green and green, which fades into blue and blue-violet.  The red necessary to complete the trio of primaries is found in the color mix for the reflected trees.  The red there is earthy and embellished with blue-grey and violet-gray, to keep the trees in the water reflections where they belong.
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"Moonrise over Blue Water", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD

It's difficut to tell for sure, but we figure there are at least four different types of blue used in this painting.  We know that Emerson Glass did not use "green" in his palette, but mixed all his secondary and tertiary colors.  Thus the marvelous greens in his paintings are all the result of a life study of color mixing.

In the sky and water, the blues transcend from blue-green to a deep violet-blue... and in between there are various combinations to give a wide range of effects.  In the moon and its reflection, the purest yellow is used to great effect, then only mildly mixed with various blues to make everything from teal to deep ultramarine.  The most difficult place for such green is the sky, where anything more than the barest hint of green tends to make a sky look "heavy".  In this work, EEG lets go of the concept of "green" and creates an exceptional "yellowish blue" instead that gives off a subtle glow of an atmospheric night blue that is "influenced" by yellow.  Such an effect is very difficult to achieve.  But upon closer look, we see that the underpainting of honey-red neutralizes the effect of "green" and gives the vibrancy that is sought by the color mix.  Only the most astute student of color theory could make such a visual statement.

Then there is the use of the complement of blue, which is orange.  It is no coincidence that the branches of the trees, which are placed just so to catch the last light of the setting sun, have a glow with an orange cast.  These branches thrust themselves into the center of the painting and its various blues to create a resonant energy that stimulates the eyes and offers satisfaction of both mind and heart.  No such effect could be made if the artist had used the typical green of tree foliage.

Finally, the greatest visual contrast is found in the center of the painting, where the dark trunks and branches of one tree are positioned against the light yellows of the moon's reflection.  This creates an immediate center of interest and holds the eyes at the place of the most profound color relationships.  But then, immediately above that is the greatest color contrast.  The orange branches of the other tree are set against the dark blues of the background mountains and draws the eyes to the moon, where the branches point.

And so... what appears to be a simple subject, in the end is discovered to be a very complex color expression.  The color relationships are carefully worked out to bring each one to its full effect and offer an artwork that is satisfying in every way.  An exceptional color expression by Emerson Glass.
$550

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"Closed", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches  SOLD

A stark and starkly biographical work by Emerson Glass.  This painting was painted in a fashion like no other we have ever seen... relatively flat, simple, uncomplicated and to the point.  By it's very simplicity, this work takes on a haunting and personal statement of the artist's isolation from the rest of the world.

The scene is bare of details and things, but more so of people, save for the lone figure on the bench.  The streets are empty and silent.  There is the barest of suggestions of homes in the background, where dimly lit windows secure their privacy against the outside.

The focus of this work is obviously the small ice cream parlor known here as "Maude's Soda Shop"  A bit of the interior can be seen, but all is overridden by the neon sign that simply says "closed".  It is profound that the artist did not paint a bar, hotel, or another gathering place.  The ice cream parlor suggests innocence, a place where families and children go for fun and pleasure, a common comfortable place for most people.  And yet, even such a place would have been very uncomfortable for E E Glass.  This work speaks volumes, like pages out of his biography, a personal statement of the artist's own isolation from society.

In our notes from conversations with Nina Glass, there was no mention of a dog, although it makes perfect sense that the artist and his wife would have one to watch over Nina during the EEG's forays into the hills.  And yet, here is the dog, who is with the artist himself, sitting in the darkness contemplating this simple place of enjoyment.  It makes one wonder just what EEG would be thinking, and why would he "sneak" into a town under a cloak of darkness and contemplate such a place?  Or, as the painting suggests, was the artist contemplating the neon sign that virtually screams "Closed!".

The scene is at night, and again shows the moon and its companion evening star, both symbols of the companionship between EEG and Nina.  On the left, a single tree, bare of leaves, echos the sense of isolation.  In me, the scene evokes memories of Edward Hopper's famous "Nighthawks", another simple statement where the people were on the inside, but nonetheless isolated in their postures.  Overall, this painting is poignant, much the biographical statement like "The Artist's Life" series... and a profound insight into the heart of the Emerson Glass.
$850

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"Wildflowers amidst a Sculpted Tree", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches  SOLD

More like sculpture than painting, this work is deceptively complex. The tree form is exactly as it was found, according to the sketches and drawing records of the artist (see our image below of the pen & ink drawing... not included with this offering). We know the artist did most of his preliminary work with pencil on location. Only a few of the most important pencil sketches were then executed in pen & ink drawings. The image below of the drawing shows the great care and study EEG placed on this work (you can see the drawing on our EEG drawings page)

This great fallen tree is surrounded by the wildflowers of the Rockies, mostly Wild Blue Flax (blue-violet and purple) and Hawkbeard (yellow), which grow profusely in the wind blown regions of the Rocky Mountains. These spots of color are painted in the correct proportions as seen in this painting. The flowers are very low growing, clinging close to the ground where they escape the worst of the wind. The season of these flowers is fairly short, but the are replaced by other species throughout the growing season from the first snow melt in spring to the first snow fall in the autumn.

The tree itself is a marvel of sculpture, formed by the elements of high altitude from 8,000 feet up to the timberline, at around 11,000 feet above sea level. The brush work on this painting is exceedingly careful, with much draftsmanship as also done in the drawings. No work of man can compare to the beauty of the sculpture executed by the wind and elements of the mountains.

The overall color of the tree, which is of course mostly gray in nature, is defined by yellows, reds, violets and blue-grays, which are all mixed by the eyes. This gives the work much interest and a subtle color input that is balanced in stellar fashion by the small but pure amounts of the yellows and violets of the wildflowers. The same colors are used again in the sky, where the setting sun and setting crescent moon and evening star, are done with colors that harmonize beautifully with those of the tree and flowers. This makes for a dynamic of color that is typical of EEG painting, but also the end effect is that of harmony and peace.

It is so appropriate for the time to be of sunset, given the subject. All life finds its sunset at one time or another, and the hazy and somewhat mysterious atmosphere of this work creates an character appropriate for the subject. A complete and carefully thought out work by EEG.
$850

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"The Apex: Twisted Pine among Shredded Clouds", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches  SOLD

The dynamics of this scene are clearly the result of influence between the elements and the lone twisted pine, growning tenaciously amid large boulders and refusing to give into the wind and weather.  In the Rocky Mountains, as we have seen many times, the gnarled pines often grow out from the rocks.  The symbiotic relationship is complete... the rocks provide protection for the seeds of the trees, which in turn grow and set deep roots and provide an anchor and stability for the soil and nutrients found deep within the rocks.

We find another old friend:  the twisted, bent and bannered pine in one other painting.  It is obvious once again that EEG set his sights on his favorite subjects like this, to express them with various color combinations, times of day and conditions.  In this case, the sky and clouds are of the "impossible blue" in the words of Louis L'Amour, who often uses the phrase to describe the skies of the west... green to teal to ultramarine blue, from the color of earth to the color of the deepest oceans.  The impressionist palette is deeply ingrained in this work, with the purest of colors, especially in the sky, with pure blues and teals mixed with reds and pale yellows.  The shredded clouds are foiled in color to provide the definition of the elements that the tree faces... on this day, a crisp colorful sky loaded with wind to move the clouds with pace.  The relentless winds take their toll on all but the most stout of plant life in the mountains.  And this isolated rocky apex supports only the one pine and a few bannered shrubs.

This tree and the setting of the ridge of boulders are iconic for Emerson Glass.  The artist's work is literally defined by the elements of the mountain west.  Another superb work by EEG.
$850

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"The Artist's Life III", Oil on Panel, 12 X 12 Inches  (See also related work below)  SOLD

This is the third painting of this subject that we have seen... a major and personal effort by Emerson Glass of a type of biographical depiction.  In the quiet solitude of his camp with the rising moon and glow of a campfire, the artist finds the life he lived personified in this fine and significant work.

The figure in this painting, who could only be the artist himself, helps to provide scale for the work and also creates a sense of drama to the scene.  On a still but cool night, with snow still showing on Mt. Meeker in the Rocky Mountain National Park of Colorado, the artist rests from his work near a small lake.  The moon and evening star provide a sense of relationship and a metaphor for he and his wife, Nina.  The old and gnarled pine tree takes on added meaning in this work as well.  EEG had a warm and personal respect for these stout trees, and the metaphorical representations are always rich with meaning.

Of course, there is always the color.  The cool colors of blue, violet and teal of the evening give way to the warmth of the reds and yellows of the campfire and its reflections.  Even the moon, half hidden by the tree, takes a back seat to the glow of the fire.  The small but intense color of the fire create a focal point for the work, its smoke disipating to near invisibility as it rises.

This series is arguably the most personal of the work by Emerson Glass.  The excellent use of color, the intensity of contrasts and the personal symbolism are elements that all work together in a harmonious statement of "The Artist's Life".
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"The Artist's Life II", Oil on Panel, 12 X 16 Inches  (See also related work above)  SOLD

We have spoken much of the life of Emerson Glass.  And yet, it's the work of his own hand that speaks even better.  In the quiet solitude of the rising moon and glow of a campfire, the artist finds the life he lived personified in this fine and extremely significant work.  This is only the second painting depicting a figure we have seen in five years and over 200 paintings by EEG... and the other is apparently a study for this one.  This is a very major and personal effort by Emerson Glass.

Of course, if the painting is to have any kind of biographical connotation to it, it must be a night painting.  We have seen many night paintings, especially with the full moon, and nearly always depicted as the most quiet of of the artist's works.  There is the solitude, but also the peace.  The solitude has often been associated with the moon in a clear and still night, if even the effects of wind and elements are evident in the details.  Not only that, but the evening stars are often present, suggesting the companionship that EEG found in his wife, Nina.  Most paintings of the night have that sense of quiet and peace, confirming the comfort that Glass had with his rather isolated and reclusive life.

The painting's epic scale is enhanced by the location, near Long's Peak and Mt. Meeker in the Rocky Mountain National Park of Colorado.  In addition, the artist loved to work near bodies of water, giving him the opportunity to add more color and interest to his work.  But more than that.  Not only is there the moon to follow the artist as a companion, but the reflection of the moon to emphasize that companionship, in a biographical sense.  Then there are the companion evening stars, which are to the moon what Nina was to his life... for solitude he had, but not loneliness.
$1800
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"Peeking Moon on a Knotted Pine", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD
"The Moon Peeks through a Tree", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD
"Blowing Snow - Ridge Tops", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD
"Long View", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD

Note on "Blowing Snow"... Even in the summer time in the Rocky Mountains, there are sometimes snow storms that sweep in suddenly and then go on their way.  When the wind begins to blow, the fresh snow is picked up and blown in clouds over the rocks and ridges.  This is the subject of this refreshing small work by EEG.

Such snow storms are often not even noticed at lower elevations, where the earth is much warmer and what is snow on the mountain tops turns to rain in the valleys.  And yet, such die hards as Emerson Glass, were there to record the events.  Rather than a dip in the local pool, the artist chose to go to the isolated ridges and be there when the storm hit.  That is the difference between a dreamer and a doer... going through the effort that it takes for the extra mile, producing the greatest of paintings.

True to his character, the artist prefered the lonely places, the out of the way places, where few people go.  He liked the extra effort it took to produce paintings like this.  Just think of it... how would be know that such a dramatic effect was even there, had it not been for such men as this?  There are some who go to take photographs, and we applaud them as well, but there is something very special about the artist who took his craft to such places, spent his energy to express the fullness of his vision.  For him, we do more than applaud, we give the standing ovation.
$450
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"Impressionist Moonrise over Wind Bannered Pines", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches  SOLD

The farther we go along with the handling of the E E Glass paintings, the more we understand about how the impressionists considered color.  It goes way beyond simply making pretty pictures... they made life studies of color interactions.  How can a sky be red, green, blue and yellow, all at one time?  Can the contradictions actually be made into harmony?  Can the opposites or complementary colors be put together to create something that works, even though a macroscopic examination brings the realization that it's not logical?

In this painting, EEG has done just that... used those colors that oppose themselves in the color wheel to create vibrancy in their interactions, and yet taken as a whole, make a pleasing and harmonious effect.  I never cease to be amazed at the results of color plays.  Over the past 46 years in the art business, my interest has only grown stronger, as I see what artists are striving for.  The accomplished artist is not just looking for a "nice painting"... he is looking for something that goes beyond.  The color can't be just the "color of a moonrise", but something more.  It has to be what holds the interest of the viewer, what holds the moon in its place while stirring the movement of the earth, what feeds the soul while stimulating the intellect?

The successful artists of history are not just those who "got lucky" with the right agent.  It's those who studied their craft, those who took the extra time to go one more step farther to make an artwork worth staying with.  We have offered many E E Glass paintings of the same subject, same location, same time of day.  And yet, in each one, there has been a different twist, a different blend of colors, a different foundation for expression.

In this fine work, EEG did a foundation underpainting of a solid medium purple color before working on the scene itself.  With a purple underpainting, not only is the tone set for a soft moonrise, but the working methods of the artist bring faint suggestions of that underpainting into play with all the colors that are laid on top.  The effect is that of both harmonizing the overall color and enhancing the specific lighter colors, especially the yellows and related colors, which are complements to purple.
$950
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"Peeking Moon at Last Light", Oil on Panel, 14 X 20 Inches  SOLD

This painting is arguably the most significant work we have had to date.  The work is not only of the artist's best size, it is also the most clear and colorful of all the paintings we have seen.  The influance of the artist's friend, Birger Sandzen is quite evident.

In this work, E E Glass has achieved a great balance of color and contrast, yet displaying his virtuoso in the manipulation of color in a way that defines his best work.  Complementary color relations abound in this painting... reds against greens, blues against oranges and yellows against lavendar and purples.  These juxtapostions create a vibrant and exciting work on top of a highly complex composition that requires only the most sophisticated color understanding.

The moon is barely peeking over the distant mountains, while the unseen setting sun sheds its last light on the rest of the elements in the scene.  The two large trees are fully lit, while much of the foreground is thrown into shadow or subdued color.  The end effect is that the moon, sky and clouds take their place and purpose of setting the stage for the rest of the landscape.  The two large trees are carefully foiled against the brilliant warm colors of the clouds.  Then the eyes are carried down into the rest of the scene, and the story of a windy ledge is told in the details of the rocks and stumps.  These elements then carry the eyes back up to the moon and sky on the right of the scene, completing a complex loop.

The overall sense of this painting is of the solitude found in a quiet moonrise and peace at a time when the atmosphere and elements subside long enough to give rest to weary travelers who are fortunate enough to find themselves here at just the right moment.  A truly superb masterwork by Emerson Glass.
$2800
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"Yellow Moonrise", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD

Here is an old friend... the wind bannered cedar on a rocky ledge, likely in southern Colorado (judging from the landscape).  Except this scene was painted in the time of the last light of the sun, as it strikes the clouds and leaves it's print on the entirety of the sky and earth.  The moon is rising in this work, barely clearing the somewhat hazy lower atmosphere.  The color of this work is clear, decisive and brilliant.

There is a sense of real urgency to this painting.  Realizing that the time of day if fleeting, the artist has captured what he could, when he could.  That this work was done en plein air is likely.  Unlike the more studied paintings of this view at night, this work has an energy that belies its size.  Taken as a whole, this work literally lights up an otherwise rather ordinary scene, carrying color to its ultimate effects.

Painted over a yellow underpainting, the intensity of this work is further enhanced by the use of complimentary colors... purple against yellow, red against green, orange against blue.  All these juxtapositions are done surely on purpose, to increase the vibrancy that the colors inherently have.  The result is a painting of high energy and a pleasing effect of the rising moon at such a time of early evening.  In our opinion, a superb work by E E Glass.
$650
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"Rising Moon at Last Light", Oil on Panel, 12 X 20 Inches  SOLD

Interesting things are always happening when the last light of the sun strikes the early evening sky, just at dusk.  In this painting, the hazy atmosphere picks up the warm light of the unseen sun and partially obscures the moon, while diffusing the reds and violets into much of the landscape.

Here is the most simple of subjects... a rising moon over a ledge of rocks and bushes with a few bannered trees... simple until one begins to examine the complexities of color and composition.  The sense of "place" in this work is enhanced by the masterful balance of light and dark, complimentary color juxtapositions and an overall composition that belies the simplicity of the subject.  The rock ledge is more than just a jumble of boulders, it's a dynamic interaction of the elements of great painting.

The moon is most intriguing in this painting.  Its position amongst the bushes and its yellow and red colors blended with the violets of the lower sky, create a mysterious and haunting image.  The yellow of the moon is compliment to the violets of the sky, the green of the bushes are compliment to the reds of the upper sky.  Therefore, even in the quietude of the scene, the colors set up a resonant contrast.  This contrast draws the eyes to the moon like moths to the flame... keeping a focal point that is both vibrant and quiet, the result of the hand of an absolute master of color control.

The format, somewhat more horizontal in proportion, is also unusual, and one which we have seen in only two other compositions.  This painting, like some others has proven to be very difficult to photograph.  The violets of the lower sky seem to be especially difficult to capture.  In any case, the best color image is the overall of the painting, so you can use that for judging the color.
$1350
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"Burning Off" (Kansas), Oil on Panel, 12 X 16 Inches  SOLD

A major work by EEG.  There is great urgency in the brushwork of this painting, and none of it done by palette knife.  The urgency of the brushwork matches the scene... quick, decisive and full of color.  The billowing clouds of smoke have their strongest color near the fire, horizon and sun, and become more subdued in the higher sky.  The reds and yellows of the lower sky give way to the subtle greens of the upper sky... all done with the same brushwork as the smoke.

The scene of the distant fire does not save the viewer from the danger of the flames.  It is very evident that the fire is intense and growing by the various gestures created by wind in the smoke, flames and even the foreground tree and grasses.  It's as if the artist is saying "keep the motor running while you enjoy the moment... you may need a quick getaway".  This is not a static expression of a fire, but the very essence of how little we can control even the most modest of grass fires.  This scene is likely in the Flint Hills of eastern Kansas.  A somewhat illegible notation on the back suggests that it is near the Neosho River or perhaps in Neosho County in southeast Kansas.  A strong and dynamic work by EEG.
$1500
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"Orange Moon", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches  SOLD

We were camping in the mountains of Wyoming only a few weeks ago.  On that evening, we saw a faint orange light on the eastern horizon... and asked, "what is that?".  As we watched, the orange light became the moon, peeking through the trees, just like it's depicted in this wonderful painting.  The orange moon, so close, we felt that we could reach out and touch it.  And the stars still shone brightly in the sky, until the moon rose higher and took over the whole night.

This painting is simple, straight forward and more realistically painted than many of the more impressionist works.  The tree is wonderfully rendered in detail, and beautifully crafted in its twisted shapes and undulating form.  Even the top of the tree catches the light from the setting sun, while the lower part is in receding shadow.  The stars shine to enhance the scene, and and even the distant mountains hold their places, as if to hold their collective breath in a greeting to the rising moon.  The dark trees of the middle ground complete the composition in a way to define the relevant space between the rest of the elements of the painting.  A truly fine work by EEG.
$750
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"Sunset on two Leaning Trees", Oil on Panel, 12 X 12 Inches  SOLD

Rich in texture and color, this fine landscape carries many of the best elements of the work of Emerson Glass.  The sky colors run from red, oranges and yellows to pale greens... colors that cannot be properly caught in our images.  The overall feel of warmth is the main cast of this work, the color of the setting sun filtering every nook and cranny.  The two trees are stunning, not only in their artistic crafting, but also in their contrasts of both size and dynamics from the effects of the environment and elements of the forces that shape them.

In the high plains of the Rocky Mountains, these marvelous trees take on a character of their own, which is clearly defined in this painting.  Depicting how they react to the forces of natural growth and then being so ferociously shaped by the elements is always striking.  The process if even further dramatized by the use of dynamic color, which serves as a tool to explain the story of what the trees have to go through year after year.  In a sense, all of the paintings of EEG are really more expressions of the elements of the Rocky Mountain West... elements which shape the character of men as much as the character of the landscape.  A fine statement by Emerson Glass.
$1150
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Concept Work:  "A Dark Night with Falling Star", Oil on Panel, 5 X 7 Inches  SOLD
Color Variant: (Blue Night)  "Orange Moonrise with Falling Star", Oil on Panel, 8 X 11 Inches  SOLD
Major Work:  "A Dark Night with Falling Star", Oil on Panel, 14 X 20 Inches  SOLD

These paintings all major on the same theme that the artist made a life-long study of:  the quietness of the night sky and elements of the western skies.  This scene has the look of southern Colorado, possibly near Pueblo or Trinidad, with the distant mesas and relatively flat landscape.  Then there is the evidence of the distant community or town, with red and yellow lights glowing in the night.

These are three paintings... one is the concept, and the others are a color variation and a fine major night painting with the falling star as the prominent feature.  The night is quiet, with a cool feeling, the moon adding character but very little light to the night scene.  Nonetheless, the night is split by the falling star, with its fiery display all in full color.  The meteorite itself is made of brilliant yellow and red, creating a wake of color.  All other elements, including the moon are subdued in comparison.  Especially the foreground rocks and trees, which, even though they are carefully drawn and crafted, still remain subdued so as not to draw too much attention to themselves.  All are wonderful quiet night scenes by EEG.
Concept
Work
$350
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Color Variant
$650
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Major Work
$2250
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"Quiet Moon over a Grassy Knoll", Oil on Panel, 10 X 14 Inches  SOLD

A major painting.  And of the moon paintings we have seen, this is certainly the quietest of them all.  The artist has painted a very subdued quiet sky, in the peaceful tones around the color of teal.  The colors transcend from blue-green, to blue, to blue-violet in a very subtle fashion.  The moon rises quietly in the sky, accompanied by the two evening stars.  The color of the sky is balanced by those in the foreground... the warm yellows, reds and red-violets of the rocks and trees.  The trees are bent in such a way that they seem to be beckoning the moon to rise, although we know in our minds that they have been shaped by the winds and elements.

This must certainly be the high plains of Wyoming or northern Colorado.  The rather low hills catch the last rays of the unseen setting sun, as do the trees, rocks and grass of the foreground.  It's the last light that generates the warm colors and gives this work its quality of "presence"... that is, it creates a believability that you are standing right there and seeing the essence of a real place in a real time.  A fine work by Emerson Glass.
$1250
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"Bent Pine in a Teal Sky", Oil on panel, 8 X 11 Inches  SOLD

Once again, Emerson Glass has achieved a truly impressionist sky with the mixing of color done with the eyes in the finest tradition of both American and French Impressionists.  The colors are pale yellow, yellow-green, pale green and blue-green, with a slight mix of violet in the upper regions.  The overall effect is that of distance on a slightly hazy midday.  The mountains are kept in their place in the middle distance by the same use of blue and blue-violet.

Against the atmospheric effects is the multi-trunk pine, done in the complimentary colors of red, red-umber with purples mixed in.  The rocks carry a similar reddish tone of gray.  The greens of the tree and underlying foliage is rich with lights and darks.  The overall effect has obvious influence of Vincent van Gogh, with undulating forms echoed in the brush and knife work applications of color in both the trees and sky.

Overall, the painting speaks of motion, brought by the wind and elements of the Rocky Mountains of Colorado and Wyoming.  The influence of the elements is always present in the work of EEG, who spent much time on the high and isolated ridges.  The sense of place is there, along with the "wind in the face" of these wonderful settings at high altitude.  A fine work by Emerson Glass.
$650
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"Moonrise in a Violet Sky", Oil on panel, 8 X 11 Inches  SOLD
"Moonrise in a Violet Sky", Oiil on Panel, 14 X 20 Inches  SOLD

These are major paintings by EEG.  The larger taken from the smaller version, it is in just a bit higher key, meaning it's a brighter work overall.  Also, this painting has a fully developed foreground, lacking in the smaller version.  The details of trees, rocks and other elements are carefully painted in, giving this a greater sense of "place"... the sense that one is actually standing at the shore of this lake watching the rising of the moon.  The sky, while revealing the brightest stars, is still very bright and colorful.  The streaking falling star is very carefully crafted, with several colors together to intensify their visual impact.  Of particular note is the application of pinks and greens in the lower sky... a device of the French Impressionists, used to intensify their pale greens found in many of their paintings.

Just at the moment that the moon is beginning to light up the sky, a shooting star falls across the scene in dramatic fashion, as if to announce with a flourish that the moon is "in the house".  With colors that fall very true to nature, brilliance of the moonrise is emphatically supported by the reflections in the water.  These all flow together in a harmonious expression of color in the finest tradition of the impressionist "manifesto".  A superb work by EEG.
Smaller
Version
$850
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Large
Version
$1,800
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"Dusty Moonrise", Oil on panel, 8 X 10 Inches  SOLD

What brings an artist back to the same scene over and over? That there are obviously favorite spots is a given... but it is more than that. Every great artist in history returned to that one place, that one subject, that one idea, to accomplish something. For EEG, as with most of the impressionists of history, the color is always that challenge for accomplishment. The time of day, the changing seasons, the feel of the elements... these all offer challenges that cannot be ignored. And EEG returned to the same themes and color expressions many times. This is just such a painting. We find an old friend in the stout old cedar. We find the familiar mountains and peeking moon. But what we also find is the shifting color. In this work, the emphasis is on the purest of greens and blue-greens in the sky and other elements. The reds and yellows serve to intensify their complimentary colors of green and blue. The kind of color vibrations that result are the real story of this work. Intensity of color makes its own subject and the delight of color the real focus of this most excellent painting.
$650
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"Pure Color - Red Sky", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD
"Pure Color - Approaching Storm", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD
"Pure Color - Teal Sky", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD
"Pure Color - Misty Moonrise", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD
"Pure Color - Windblown Cedar at Sunset", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD
"Pure Color - Rising Moon", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD 
"Pure Color - Setting Sun", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD 

Another in a group of dynamic small paintings by Emerson Glass.  These artworks were obviously created simply for the sheer delight in color. This painting has all the artist's typical vision of strong color and dynamic compositions. And yet, this painting was obviously done for the purity of color above all else. The shapes of the tree forms, and even the application of the paints echo forms that give the composition a unique character and "presence" that is defined by the color alone. The influence of Birger Sandzen is clear enough, with a strength of color that captures one's immediate attention, and is further enhanced by the forms and texture of the paint, applied almost entirely with palette knife.

The colors of the tree, sky and mountains are clear and vibrant, applied with great energy and mixed with the eyes rather than the paint itself... techniques discovered by the great impressionists of both France and America. In fact this work, as with all of the paintings of EEG, embodies the very essence of the impressionists... the definition by color rather than tonal applications.

Sometimes an artwork is created simply for the sheer delight in expressing color. Here we have two more charming small paintings by E E Glass, with the artist's typical vision of strong color and dynamic compositions. And yet, these paintings were obviously done for the purity of color above all else. It carries great visual impact, with a very "van Gogh-esque" feel of undulating shapes in the sky and clouds. These shapes reflect each other in echoing forms that give the composition a unique character and "presence" that is defined by the color alone. The influence of Vincent van Gogh is clear enough, with a strength of color that captures one's immediate attention, and is further enhanced by the forms and texture of the paint, applied entirely with palette knife.
$450
Each

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"Midnight with Full Moon and Shredded Clouds", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches  SOLD

When the night is dark and the moon reflects off the clouds, poets are sitting down to write, inventors are working on new devices... and the great artists of history are at their easels, working to capture new expressions of their purpose and vision. It was on just such a night that Emerson Glass was up to express that "something" that has caught his attention and validated his purpose. That the artist is the absolute master of the night sky is a given. That he finds the most complex of paintings in the simplest of forms is astounding. In this work, the darkness of the night is found throughout, with only the moon and stars to speak into it to give a form of guidance.

The colors of the moon, sky and clouds are clear and vibrant, and yet quiet with the time of night evident. At midnight, the passing of the clouds would go unnoticed, except for the efforts of those who live to express them. The evening stars are actually the planets Venus and Mercury, two heavenly bodies that often accompany the moon in their circuits around the sun. They are most often seen near the moon, caused by their juxtaposition and reflection of the sun, long gone in its nightly journey.
$850
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"Vibrant Moonrise", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches  SOLD

The title describes the painting... vibrant. Such a profusion of color, that the entire work seems to vibrate. Here is another artwork created simply for the sheer delight in expressing color... and done for the purity of color above all else. It carries great visual impact, with a very "van Gogh-esque" feel of undulating shapes in the sky and clouds. These shapes reflect each other in echoing forms that give the composition a unique character and "presence" that is defined by the color alone. The influence of Vincent van Gogh is clear enough, with a strength of color that captures one's immediate attention, and is further enhanced by the forms and texture of the paint, applied entirely with palette knife.
$850
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Study

"Opposing Forces"
 "Opposing Forces", (Study), Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches)  SOLD
"Opposing Forces", Oil on Panel, 10 X 14 Inches  SOLD

The title of the painting was taken from the pen and ink drawing of the same scene (go to EEG drawings page). The forces shaping the scene are, first, the wind and its effect on the trees, clouds and undergrowth. The second force is that from the solid rocks that face in the opposing direction, standing firm for millennia against the wind. These rocks serve as shelter to small animals and a place for protection for the trees while they take root and grow.

In the quiet of the early evening, the rising full moon is caught in this painting in just the way it feels in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado and Wyoming. The sun is not fully set yet, and the brilliant reds and yellows invade the scene, creating color at the top of the knoll. The reds and yellows are complimented by the rich blues, greens and pale purples in the clouds and mountains. The color dynamics that result are what you find in this work.
Both
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"Approaching Storm - Rocky Mountains", Oil on Panel, 8 X 10 Inches

When the storm clouds come rolling in in the Rocky Mountains, it's time to seek shelter. The winds can be voracious and the speed with which the storms come is startling. We have personally seen times when we were cooking over an open fire, and the conditions have gone from bright and peaceful to fierce and stormy before the hamburgers were finished. Then as quickly as it had come, it was gone once again. In this fine small work, E E Glass has caught the approaching storm with stark clarity. Even the swift movement of the clouds is here. The clouds tend to shred and then reform ahead of the coming lightning and rain. Before the storm hits, the light plays games, creating darkness here, bright highlights there. It's always menacing and dramatic, but seldom disappointing for the lover of the mountains and their moods swings.

The old pine itself clearly reveals the dramatic effects of the elements at high altitude. The twisting and bending are the result of the tree's natural tendency to reach toward the sunlight and its battle with the prevailing winds that blow contrary to that. The result here is a tree that has been knotted back on itself, and yet still is reaching for light against all else contrary. The struggle for natural growth is constant in the mountains, and the trees that last bear the marks and yet survive.

EEG has kept this painting somewhat subdued in color, yet dramatic in contrast. The light hits the ledge of rocks and twisted pines, to give them a dramatic highlight against the dark and brooding clouds. A sliver of blue sky reveals some brightness of color and there are spots of brightly lit clouds to contrast the effects of the approaching storm. Overall, a fine work of a difficult subject matter, that displays the gifts and vision of the artist.
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"Sunset Reflections", Oil on Panel, 8 X 10 Inches

This is a very charming small painting by E E Glass. The scale of the work belies its size, with the artist's typical vision of strong color and dynamic compositions. This work carries great visual impact, with a very "van Gogh-esque" feel of undulating shapes in the trees and clouds. These shapes reflect each other in echoing forms that give the composition a unique character and "presence". The influence of Vincent van Gogh is quite evident, as is the influence of Birger Sandzen... with a strength of color that captures one's immediate attention, which is further enhanced by the forms and texture of the paint, applied by both brush and palette knife. The striking effects of these colors is even greater in impact than in the images we made of the painting.
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"Burn-Off of the Morning Clouds", Oil on Panel, 10 X 14 Inches

If you experience the Mountain West, this is exactly what you'll sometimes find just at sunrise, say on the high plains of Wyoming at about 9,000 feet. The morning clouds move so swiftly, that you get the feeling of being caught up yourself and moving with exhileration across the skies. Without hindrances to movement, the wind sweeps across the plains and tears at the clouds, shredding and dissipating them so quickly, one seems to be in a time-lapse motion picture. In the early morning, we find ourselves in the yellow, lemon-green and pink of the day, while the lavender-gray of the clouds bring startling contrast to the color of sunrise.

This work is a complete expression of color compliments... the lavender of the clouds is the exact compliment to the yellow of the sunrise, the pinks of the lower light are the exact compliment to the greens of the upper sky. The rich darks of the trees and rocks are the exact value compliments of the lights of the sky and clouds. These complimentary colors react off each other and create a vibrancy that adds to the feel of movement in the scene itself. The clouds are not static or lazy... but race through their brief existence with an almost childlike exuberance. They form and dissipate, form again and shred into pieces only to repeat the cycle again in an endless parade of shapes and movements... like a forever dance that creates a stirring memory in the heart of anyone who will take the time to take it in. Again and again.

This is only one of the reasons why the West is so captivating to those who come here, and the few of us who have the privilege of living here. How can anyone come to Wyoming (or Colorado, Montana or Utah) and not be caught up in the dynamics of such a place. The great Mountain West is a place of dynamics... a vast sky so large that, day or night, one comes to sense the place of men in the scheme of creation. It's where the movement of life is reflected in the elements of one's environment, echoed in creation in such a way that mirrors the beating of one's heart.
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"Twilight on Three Trees", Oil on Panel, 12 X 12 Inches

When the sun dips behind the horizon is when Emerson Glass life's work began... and over time, gave him the momentum to become the master of night painting.  No other artist is history has been able to capture the evening sky like EEG.  We have presented many works of the night, from early evening to the complete blackness of full dark.  Many have depicted the moon in various phases, some have simply been done for the pleasure of drawing color out of darkness.

The color dynamics of twilight are particularly interesting and variable from day to day.  The lingering light of the sun invades every aspect of the scene and is dramatically contrasted with the blue and green of the sky.  The moon and evening star add their own touch of color without taking away from the main focus of the setting sun.

This painting is an expression of color compliments all in itself.  Red and green are opposits on the color scale and create their own vibration by interactions when mixed by the eyes.  Such contrasts are what take this painting beyond simply a depiction of a scene of twilight.  A great accomplishment of impressionism.
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"Milky Way & Falling Star", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches

This is an unusual and exceptional subject for any artist... but for Emerson Glass, Master of Night Painting, it is the ultimate challenge. If you have ever stood in the higher elevations of the west and looked toward the southeast on a clear and moonless night, you will see the Milky Way Galaxy in all its splendor. Standing away from the city lights, the spectacular formation of our own galaxy takes on just exactly the appearance as you see in this painting. Even the photographs of the night scene can't do this justice. In this painting, the artist has given us the essence of the night, and all the feel that a photograph cannot

At the lowest horizon, the reflections of the city lights of Colorado Springs, Colorado are subtlety rendered. The city is identified on the back of the painting... "Milky Way, looking southeast toward Colorado Springs" A fine work by a master of both draftsmanship as well as the impressionist methods.
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"Quiet Pool with Moonrise and Evening Star", Oil on Panel, 10 X 14 Inches

In the quiet of the early evening, the rising full moon is caught in this painting in just the way it feels in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado and Wyoming.  The sun is not fully set yet, and the brilliant reds and yellows invade the scene, creating a grand spectical of color.  The reds and yellows are complimented by the rich blues and pale purples in the clouds and mountains.  The color dynamics that result are what you find in this work.

This is a very "Sandzen-esque" painting.  The sky and clouds bear much of the colors that set the tone, while the moon carries it into the color of the water in the pool.  The distant mountains, rocks and trees are reflected in the pool.  Such pools occur in the mountains whereever there is a sufficient pileup of rocks and earth to hold them.  The fine rendering of the rising moon and sky is the very essence of the work of Emerson Glass, who seems to have relished in the challenges of the early evening sky.  Even the evening star is rendered with great care.  A rather exceptional work by EEG.
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"Moonrise on Two Cedars, Oil on Panel, 6 X 6 Inches

This is a very charming small painting by E E Glass. The scale of the work belies its small size, with the artist's typical vision of strong color and dynamic compositions. This work carries great visual impact, which is actually a plus for the size. The strength of color captures one's immediate attention, and is further enhanced by the texture of the paint, applied by both brush and palette knife.  The colors of the sky and trees are applied with great energy and mixed with the eyes rather than the paint itself... a technique discovered by the great impressionists of both France and America. As the eyes interpret the mixing of colors, they find stimulation in the process, keeping the work fresh.
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"Forest Fire on Cedar Ridge", Oil on panel, 14 X 20 Inches

The viewer is standing on this ridge, feeling the intensity of the fire about to top out near the ridge itself.  The energy and luminosity of the flames is executed in thick paint with a palette knife, rich with juicy paint and texture.  Then, the rising clouds of smoke are done more and more with brush, to give the sense of dissipation.  The painting techniques keep the focus on the center stage of the action, where the heart of the flames can be literally felt with the fingers.

The rest of the painting is done with darker subdued colors, hightening the effects of the the flames.  The few trees still standing seem to have their own reaction to the heat, especially those closer to the fire take on the same shapes as the flames themselves, echoing the effects of voracity.  In the thick of the clouds of smoke, even the sun finds only the barest identification of its own presence.  In every way, this is a major work by EEG, with great energy and vitality that expresses the subject in a way not seen before.e
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"Storm in the Rockies" (Estes Park, Colorado), Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches

There is great urgency to this painting. Most of the background was done with a brush... with quick but precise strokes. The urgent brush work adds a sense of motion to the colors as well, creating vibrancy and luminosity to the overall work.  The feel of the fast moving clouds is here, as is the anticipation of the storm that surrounds this knoll. The almost desperate feel of the brush work gives this painting a genuine sense of being there, with the rush of wind and rain.
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"Last Light on Blue Lake", Oil on Panel, 14 X 20 Inches

Another major painting by EEG.  The feel of the last light falling on a group of trees, rocks, snow and water is mesmorizing.  The strength of color around the lake defines the light of the sun.  The distant peaks do likewise, but in a more subtle manner, keeping them in the distance where they belong.  The contrasts in textures keeps the overall painting from being stifled.  In places, the smooth textures in the rocks allow the focus to go to the trees and foliage.  In others, the rough but simple textures of rocks define the ruggedness of the mountains and puts us there in their midst to feel the overwhelming power of the landscape.
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"Sunset on a Windy Ridge", Oil on Canvas, 12 X 16 Inches, Signed lower left

This painting is a bit earlier than most we have seen by E E Glass. We estimate the date at 1965, but it could be earlier than that. The color is applied entirely by brush, thickly done and with great flair and urgency. The light effects of the setting sun are bold and striking. The reds are warm and vibrant, complemented nicely by the greens of the pines and the warm lavenders of the background and lower foreground.
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"Nina's Weeping Cherry Tree", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches

Nina Brandt Glass was the artist's wife. That there was sincere affection for each other is quite evident, even if from nothing more than this fine small painting. This work relates to a drawing of this same tree that was titled on the verso (see on our web site at gbtate.com/agoeeglassdrawings.html). The intimate size simply adds to the intimacy of the subject.

This painting is carefully rendered and the draftsmanship very sure. The colors are very bright and sparkle against the nicely colored background of light teal in the sky, pale purple of the mountains and blue-green of the middle ground ridges. These background colors are complements of the bright pinks and greens of the tree, adding further vibrancy to it. EEG preferred the use of both brush and palette knife, and used both to great effectiveness in this fine work.
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"A Cedar Grows out of the Rock", Oil on Panel, 8 X 8 Inches

It is astounding that Emerson Glass did not "invent" trees... he actually hiked the mountains and went to the high ridges where these wonderful trees grow, and did his work there on location and drew and painted the trees just as they are. From conversations with Nina Glass, the artist's widow, we discovered that he disdained the "fake" or "generic" trees so often seen in artworks. And despite the fact that the artist was an impressionist, his philosophy was that, just because an artist concentrated on color, did not mean that he had to throw away the fundamentals of good drawing. He would often say that "good drawing is the foundation of good painting"... a lesson that should be well learned by artists today.

This painting is carefully rendered, in that the concentration on the cedar is obvious, and the draftsmanship very sure. EEG preferred the use of both brush and palette knife, and used both to great effectiveness in this fine work. Notice that the brush was used to make flat color where it was needed to support the work in palette knife, such as the sky just behind the branches of the cedar. In other places of the sky, the knife was used to create more texture and give the clouds a greater sense of movement. Similar devices were used in the rocks and bushes on the left of the painting.
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"Rising Moon over Red Waters", Oil on Panel, 10 X 14 Inches

The artist seems to have taken stock from time to time, to fit together a number of ideas and concepts into one painting.  This is such a work.  The feel of the painting is very real.  And yet, we find the complete impressionist "manifesto" of definition by color filling this wonderful work.  Every corner of the painting finds the eyes in a stimulated satisfaction that is fulfilling in every way.  The fabulous mix of a variety of colors keeps this composition lively and luminous.  We have purchased a frame expecially for this painting (see our images in the gallery page), a bare suggestion of how excited we are about it.
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The "Grand Canyou Suite" (No, not by Ferde Grof)...

The Grand Canyon series of paintings and drawings dramatically gives a signal of a new level of maturity in the artist's work.  It's much more than the subject, it's the grasp of the artist of the spread of the horizon, the depth of the gorges and the scope of the subject matter.  The Grand Canyon is an epic subject that has been successfully rendered by only the greatest of artists, who have been up for the task... Thomas Moran, Gunnar Widforss and a few others.  It's not just a "landscape painting"... but rather the sense of the atmosphere and expression of the great distance as perceived by the eyes.

The development of the concepts from the drawings and color studies throught he finished major painting, is a veritable study in the impressionist techniques.  The transcendence from black & white to color and the experimentation of color interactions is astounding.  The 8 X 10 inch study of the two cedars is a major accomplishment in itself, where the foundation of the cool background colors sets the stage for the interactions of the bold warm colors of the foreground subjects.

In typical EEG fashion, the initial focus is on the rocks and trees of the left foreground.  It is in every one of the works, and offers a resting focal point for the rest of the vast composition.  In the final version, the distant landscape is rendered more softly, allowing the foreground to stand on its own, and adding an extra demension of depth the remainder of the work.  Overall an outstanding accomplishment by Emerson Glass.

The major painting, Oil on Canvas, 24 X 40 Inches  SOLD 
The large study, Oil on Panel, 12 X 24 Inches  SOLD 
Color Study of Two Cedars, Oil on Panel, 8 X 10 Inches  SOLD 
Grand Canyon, Lone Cedar #1, Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD 
Grand Canyon, Lone Cedar #2, Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD
Pen & Ink Drawing, Black Ink on Gray Paper, 10 X 12 Inches  SOLD 
"Reaching for the Light", Oil on Panel, 12 X 16 Inches

"Chiaroscuro" is Italian for "light-dark", and is a form of painting that has been developed since the time of the Renaissance, most dramatically seen in Italian painting. Chiaroscuro paintings are like live dramatic performances, the main subjects emphasized with strong light while the background is left dark and somewhat undefined. The drama in this work by E. E. Glass is created by the light of the unseen setting sun hitting the old twisted and bent pine... and that set against the deep darks of the middle ground rocks and brush. The foreground drama is quietly taking place as the setting sun casts its last glow on the rocky ledge. A theatrical work by EEG.

The application of pigments of this work is more "brushy" than most of EEG's work, and for good reason. The main palette knife work has been done in the bent pine and rocks nearest to it. Most of the rest of the painting is done more flatly... causing it to recede and adding to the sense of drama. Since the eyes are naturally attracted to the areas of greatest texture, the pine clearly stands out as the focal point of the painting. In contrast, the moon and sky, as well as the rocks and foliage, hold their places in the background as a result of painting with less texture.

The colors of this work tend much toward the warm reds, oranges and yellows. Even the greens are of a warm feel, with much yellow and ocher included with them. The pine is found growing among a group of large and imposing boulders. The afternoon sun barely reaches the tree, and the twists and bends are the result of a tree constantly in search of light. The wind and elements would play a much smaller role in the growth in such a place, since the rocks provide protection and a break from the wind. Growing from the soil and not the rocks would give the tree greater nourishment. So the only struggle for such a tree would be the struggle for light... causing twists and turns, with branches heading off in many directions. Keen observation is required to define this scene... not just the painting of a tree, but a believable setting that secures the sense of place and a meaningful explanation of the growth. A fine work by a master of both draftsmanship as well as the impressionist methods.

NOTE:  This painting relates to the drawing "Life at the Timberline", which can be seen at our EEG Drawings Page
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"What is the Color of Night?"... Two Impressionist Night Paintings
Each an Oil on Panel, 6 X 6 Inches

These are both taken from the same location, just different times of night.  How can anyone capture the dark of night, and still make it vibrate with color, as these works do? It seems an impossible task, and yet Emerson Glass has done exactly that. The sky is a complete expression of color that defines not only the color of night, but also the feel. Whether there is color from the setting sun or not, these works both vibrate with color. Just the night. The coolness of the night, the haunting suggestion of trees and rocks that one has to almost feel his way through. We must be still to echo the stillness of the night sky. These paintings demands something of us... to be a part of the scene, even as if we were sitting on a rock ourselves, waiting for time to do its work of magic again and again.

If these comments sound a bit poetic, it's because that is what these paintings have drawn out of us.  They offer a vibrancy of color that belies the subject. The colors are at one case bright, in the other subtle, but the principles of color interaction are still in play... the quiet violets against the blues and greens, yellows against the purples and the darks against the lights. These works have fittingly been accomplished on black underpainting, adding to the impact of the night colors and creating a sense of intensity and space. We consider these to be masterworks of a most difficult subject that has been carried out to the last degree of excellence by a master of impressionism.
Both
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"Twisted Pine on a Rocky Ledge", Oil on Panel, 12 X 12 Inches

The impact of the elements are nowhere more evident than on these fine old pines that grow out from the rocks of the western mountains.  They begin life protected by the rocks, but then as they take root and grow, they begin to be shaped by the wind, rain, snow and altitude.  The results can be startling, as with this fine old tree... twisted and bent, yet standing strong despite the elemtents.  A fine statement by EEG.
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"Twilight on an Old Pine", Oil on Panel, 14 X 20 Inches

Color is the point of this fine major painting.  The yellows, reds and violets of the sky are offset against the greens, blues and yellows of the landscape.  The sky is wonderfully painted, reflecting the light effects of twilight in the mountains of the west.  A major work by EEG.
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"Moonrise at Keyhole Rock", Oil on Panel, 16 X 22 Inches

With the moonrise also comes the last light of the setting sun.  The reds of the light reflect into the rocks and distant hills.  The rising moon is nicely rendered in the water, as is the distant hills are seen through the Keyhole Rock, near the center of the painting.  A fine and major work by EEG.
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"Cliffside at Moonrise", Oil on Panel, 8 X 10 Inches (See the pen & ink drawing for this work HERE)

If there is a finer and more natural evening sky painted anywhere on earth, we have not found it.  The unique style of EEG has met the challenge of the moonrise on many occasions... but in this painting, the effects are so natural, that one scarcely notices the impressionist methods.  The moon has a luminous glow, and the evening star shines with a brilliance that can only be found in the western sky.  It's the "still of the night" that is found here, like none other we have ever seen.

The execution of color... from greens and blues to the violets and reds in the sky... all flow in such a way that the resulting luminosity is found only in the work of the finest masters of the craft.  Even the waning light from the setting sun is felt in the soft glow of the cliff side.  In addition, nearly all the elements point to the rising moon, always retuning to it as the central focus.  Despite it's small size, this work qualifies as a masterwork of Emerson Glass.
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"Ruby Moon #1, Oil on panel, 5 X 7 Inches  SOLD 
"Ruby Moon #2, Oil on panel, 5 X 7 Inches  SOLD 

How can two paintings be so similar and yet so different?  These two small moon paintings both are excercises in red.  Moon #1 has written on the back notations for three reds, alizarin crimson, cadmium red and magenta.  Moon #2 has written on the back only one red, alizarin crimson.  In addition, #1 is painted on a medium purple underpainting, #2 on a black underpainting.

The effects of these colors cannot be truely captured in our images.  Nonetheless, you can see even there that there are remarkable differences in two paintings of such similar composition.  The reds of #1 are warmer, with influences of yellow.  The red of #2 is more coherent and complemented with yellow.  Both are made more vibrant by the green surrounding the moon.  Outstanding color statements.
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A continuing series of moon Paintings... Each 6 X 8 Inches:

"Two Evening Stars" (Twilight)  SOLD
"Blue Moon" (Moments before Sunrise)  SOLD
"Peeking Moon over Red Lake"  SOLD
"Full Moon with Red Glow"  SOLD
"Rising Moon in a Lavender Sky"  SOLD
"Peeking Moon and Shooting Star"  SOLD
"Two Stars"  SOLD
"Umber Moon"  SOLD
"Bright Moon"   SOLD
"Rising Moon, Rising Mist"   SOLD

These fine small paintings just keep acomin'.  Each of these works were executed in a different manner... from the tight and controled "Two Stars", to the Old Master touch in "Umber Moon", and then to the very "Sandzen-esque" "Bright Moon".  "Rising Moon, Rising Mist" is worked with several layers of pigments, from the underlying honey toning to the final application by brush over the pallette knife applications.

The two newest paintings, "Rising Moon in a Lavender Sky" and "Peeking Moon and Shooting Star" are both achieving startling effects.  The use of complementary colors heightens the impact of the elements of the paintings, as do all these fine work by EEG.

The artist seems to be making a statement, that there are no limitations to the creative effects of pure color.  Thses are more like excercises in the pure enjoyment of painting.  Each painting has its own feel.  Each one is executed with a technique that reflects its particular mood.

Some of these paintings have written on the back a notation about the colors used.  In each case, the paintings reflect the pallette and application so well, that these are all considered finished products, rather than studies.
$450
Each

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"Emerald Moon", Oil on panel, 5 X 7 Inches  SOLD

This is a jewel of a painting. The entire work literally vibrates with contrasts and complementary colors, with the concentration being on the excitement of reds placed against blues and greens. Since red, a primary color, is placed against greens, a secondary color, these make for a sustained satisfaction. The size of this work suggests a gem. Its small size attracts attention because of its vibrancy. Even the evening star is made luminous by these same type of contrasts and color interactions.
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"Moon and Shredded Clouds", Two paintings, each 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD

These small works are vignettes of concepts regarding the color of the night. EEG did many of these fine paintings... each one a complete work in itself, an exercise in the expression of the impressionist "manifesto". The philosophy of the impressionists in founded in the interactions of such colors against each other.

These paintings are marked on the back in pencil with such notations as, "aliz crim" (alizarin crimson), "ult blu" (ultramarine blue) and "pr blu" (Prussian blue). The various noted colors are those emphasized in these expressions and are used for their interactions with each other. The result are luminous paintings that depicts the night sky with vibrant color effects that cannot be duplicated with even our carefully made images.
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"Moonrise at Cedar Ridge", Oil on Panel, 10 X 14 Inches  SOLD

The rising moon sets the color, mood and sense of peace for this fine painting.  The colors, blend together in soft harmonies to create such peace.  The old and bent cedars trees speak of bygone storms and elements that have shaped them, but through all that, the peace remains.  A fine "Sandzen-esq" painting by Emerson Glass.
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"Last Light on a Rocky Ledge", Oil on Panel, 10 X 14 Inches  SOLD

"Chiaroscuro" is Italian for "light-dark", and is a form of painting that has been developed since the time of the Renaissance, most dramatically seen in Italian painting. Chiaroscuro paintings are like live performances, the main subjects emphasized with strong light while the background is left dark and somewhat undefined. The drama in this work by E. E. Glass is created by the light of the setting sun hitting the group of rocks and trees... and that set against the deep darks of the middle ground ridges. While the color of the painting is really set into the rising moon and sky, the foreground drama is quietly taking place as the setting sun casts its last glow on the rocky ledge. A fine and theatrical work by EEG.
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"Forest Fire - The Sun Darkened by the Smoke", Oil on Panel, 7 X 10 Inches  SOLD

With an urgency that fits the dramatic subject matter, this remarkable painting was most assuredly executed on location, if not very nearby. The dramatic lights and darks literally define the awesome power of the fire. The stark reds and yellows are the very heart colors of heat and flames. The application of the paint is thick and done with speed and accuracy by the sure hand of the master of impressionism. The effect of the clouds of smoke almost hiding the sun is equally remarkable. It cannot be possible for the subject to be interpreted with any greater sense of "place" than this work. We have seen very few paintings in our 45 years of business of this subject, and none that ever grabbed our attention like this. For its small size, we consider this a master work, not equaled by anything we have ever seen.
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"Storm on the Plains", Oil on Panel, 14 X 20 Inches  SOLD

On the plains of Wyoming, Colorado and Montana, the winds can be brutal.  The elements are "in charge", as the winds exceed 80 MPH at times, and are the primary force in shaping the landscape.  In this painting, the rain is approaching, but the trees are ready, having been through this many times before.  The fine old bent pine is still here through the years of such elements... and survives perhaps even on account of them, or perhaps despite them.
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"Approaching Storm on a Grassy Knoll", Oil on Panel, 14 X 20 Inches  SOLD
"Approaching Storm on a Grassy Knoll", Oil on Panel, 10 X 14 Inches  SOLD

 Click HERE to see a comprehensive 24 point narrative on this painting
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"Twilight on Estes Park", Oil on canvasboard, 16 X 20 Inches

We count no fewer than 80 stars in it, both bright and very dim... plus the lights of the distant village of Estes Park and the twilight of the setting sun.  By all appearances, the house in the lower right is the artist's home itself... shown with lights on and smoke coming from the chimney.  The artist was known to live near Estes Park, but not in the town, and we believe it is perfectly evident that this was his place and view of the town.  The far distance of Estes Park seems to emphasize the isolation he so loved.
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"October 16, 5 AM... Coffee's Waiting", Oil on panel, 6 X 8 Inches

In his writings, Louis Lamour often talks about the "impossible blue" of the western skies.  The blues in this study cannot be captured by camera.  These images can only suggest the depth of color created by at least three different blues used to draw the viewer deep into this painting.  The blues in turn serve to enhance the bold yellows and slight touches of red and violet that give this work a strong luminosity.  The faint suggestion of a soon rising sun at the horizon place the time of morning.  In addition, this is one of the few EEG paintings with a notation on the back, this one stating the date and time of day.  Faintly curling smoke and lights come from the cabin... the artist's home perhaps?
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A Series of Paintings, showing the influence of Birger Sandzen
Each an oil on panel, 9 X 12 Inches, Signed and in Excellent Condition...

"Late Afternoon", Depicting the passing clouds with low light from the setting sun - SOLD
"Moon over Dark Waters", Depicting the risen full moon and its reflections on a lake - SOLD
"Rising Moon in an Emerald Sky", Depicting the moon in the early evening skies - SOLD
"Towering Clouds", Depicting the reflection of the setting sun on rising cumulus clouds - SOLD

As we sort out the influence of Birger Sandzen on the work of E E Glass, we see some answers in these paintings.  The colors are very much the same as those of Sandzen at the height of his career in the 1920's.  However, we find a much more "natural" application of these colors in the work of E E Glass.  The clouds have the soft shredded look, found so often in the mountains.  The rocks are formed with the feel of the light on them from a source, seen or unseen, that forms a more accurate sense of volume and space that they have in nature.  These paintings are great examples, showing both the influence of Sandzen and the independent thought of Emerson Glass.

We do not call these works "studies" as each is a complete and satisfying statement of its own.  These are expressions of an impressionist philosophy that invade all of the work of Emerson Glass.  The colors are bold... and yet when these are seen in person, they take on a softness and unity that cannot be captured well in our images.

A fine series of color works by Emerson Glass.
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"Sunset on a Lonely Ridge", Oil on panel, 9 X 12 Inches

The sunset is blazing behind a wind torn ridge.  The reds of the sun invade everything, being reflected in the tree, rocks and other elements of the painting.  Interesting, the rocks form a pattern that points first to the bannered pine, then ultimately back to the setting sun.  The blaze of the setting sun rises like fire from a hearth, mixing both warm and cool reds with the blues of thes sky... fine color dynamics.
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"Peeking Moon", Oil on Panel, 14 X 20 Inches

Another "Sandzen-esque" painting.  This was probably done in southern Colorado, our opinion due simply to the painting's similarities to others that have been identified.  A major work, this painting has all the elements that the artist has obviously picked up from his friend, Birger Sandzen.  The rising moon casts it's light on the water, while the setting sun casts its glow on both foreground and background.  The large tree and rocks carry the reds of the sun, but the remarkably painted distant mountains have a soft glow that carries the same feel.  A wonderful work by a true master of American impressionism.
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"Shooting Star", Oil on Panel, 10 X 14 Inches

A remarkable example of the impressionist theory and techniques.  Virtually all of the painting is done in primary colors (red, yellow and blue), with only a small smattering of one complementary, violet.  In at least one area, the primary colors are each painted in full strength, not mixed to tone it down.  This makes for vibrant effects, but without any garish results anywhere on the painting.  Even the crescent moon and Venus give a soft glow about them.  It's the shooting star that steals the show, and hence the title.
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"Evening Star" (An Impressionist Sky), Oil on Panel, 10 X 14 Inches

This work is a similar composition to a smaller one (below). The stunning effects are created by the vibrations of colors... the primaries (red, yellow and blue) set against the secondary colors (green, orange and violet). These set up energetic color interactions, upon which the impressionist "manifesto" is structured. That subjects are defined by color and light was at one time a startling departure from the traditional schools. Nonetheless, the impressionist vision has been taken up by American artists since the turn of the 20th century and has remained one of the dominant philosophies ever since. That Emerson Glass has his place among the most energetic of the impressionists is obvious.
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"Storm in the Rocky Mountains", Oil on Canvas, 18 X 24 Inches

The result of time, study and effort... a major work and a painting that is quintessential E E Glass.  All the elements and feel of the artist's vision, the expression of the essence of the mountains, are in this painting.  The storm is approaching indeed, but the character of the trees, rocks and weather are the result of what has gone before, and will come again.  The colors are "oriental rug" colors... deeper primary colors (red, yellow and blue) that create a greater richness of the subject and enhances the drama.  A superb painting by EEG, and the full expression of all the artist is.  (See also the comments on the study below)
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"Storm in the Rocky Mountains" (Study), Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 1/2 Inches

The land of the Rocky Mountains is shaped by the elements... especially evident on the high ridges, where the wind, rain and snow all come unabated.  It takes a strength to survive these elements that is difficult to understand without actually walking the ridges and feeling the elements for one's self.  The fine old pines cling to life like nowhere else on earth, and some (like these trees) even thrive against all odds.  This fine small painting has the feel of it all, and there is no doubt about the tenacity of life under harsh conditions.  Its small size belies the epic feel of this fine work.
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"Moonrise on a Windy Cliff", Oil on Panel, 12 X 16 Inches

The quietness of the moonrise is evident, even on a windy ridge.  Interestingly, the paint is applied thickly in the areas where the greatest attention is desired, such as the moon and stout old pine growing over the cliff's edge.  In other areas, slightly thinner paint causes the eyes to perceive the background as one would in nature.  This compliment of textures draws and excites the eyes from the moon and the pine, then gives them a rest in the foreground pond and rocks.  The use of chiascuro in the lower part of the painting creates a contrast and a fine secondary interest in the pond, a touch obviously learned from the old masters.
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"Moon and Shredded Clouds" is filled with drama.  Of particular note is the way the artist painted in the greens immediately around the moon... and then used the compliment of green (i.e. red) to create a most vibrant and glowing center of interest.  The transparency of the clouds is very nicely defined, and the shredding effect is completely believable.  The luminosity of the moon's reflections off the clouds is beautifully handled... the farther away from the moon, the lesser the impact of the color on them.

"Moonrise Behind a Cliff" is an exercise in complimentary colors, and yet the most harmonious of them all.  Despite the use of contrasting colors painted side-by-side, they keep their place by being somewhat muted for a quieter effect.  The darks of the landscape serve to provide a foil to make the sky glow and create the effects of a sky completely defined by the moon, with no evidence of a setting sun behind.

"Moonset with Blazing Sun" is highly luminous.  Obviously, the sunset painting is filled with dramatic color, with the blazing sun painted with the purest of yellows and reds.  The moon is held in place by making it slightly less intense than the sunset, just as one would expect in real life.  The sky colors are a blend of deep blue-violet mixed on the surface with a deep red-violet.  These are complimentary colors to the yellow of the sunset, enhancing the vibrancy even further.
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"Setting Sun, Setting Moon on Three Trees", Oil on Panel, 8 X 8 Inches

Few works by E E Glass stir up the feelings of the early evening sky like this fine small painting.  The artist is a true master of the impressionist sky.  The last glow of the sun is rendered in an vibrant yellow that graduates into the cool reds and lavenders of the sky.  Even the moon is "rounded" by the use of the same red that permeates the sky.  But, it's a different warmer red that invades the landscape of trees and rocks.  Many reflections of the setting sun make this work vibrate.  A fully mature and complete work by the artist.
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"Moonrise with Red Clouds", Oil on panel, 6 X 8 Inches, Signed lower left  SOLD
"Moonrise, Impressionist Sky", Oil on panel, 6 X 8 Inches, Signed lower right  SOLD
"Blazing Sunset, Crecent Moon", Oil on panel, 6 X 8 Inches, Signed lower left  SOLD

We received these three small impressionist sunset paintings from the estate of E E Glass. What we got was more than what we expected. These works are all cut from the true impressionist mold. They all have that vibrant sense of color interaction that makes impressionism what it is. All are the same size (6 X 8 inches) and all offer visual impact that belies their small size.

These are highly luminous paintings.  The sky of each of them is a study in color interactions.  In each work, the primary colors (red, blue and yellow) are painted closely with their complementary secondary colors (orange, green and violet).  This juxtaposition sets up a vibration that is the essence of the impressionist "manifesto"... creating excitement within the paintings that goes beyond the immediate subject matter.
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"Yellow Sunrise #1", Oil on panel, 8 X 11 Inches, Signed lower left  SOLD

"Yellow Sunrise #2", Oil on panel, 6 X 8 Inches, Signed lower right  SOLD

"Yellow Sunrise #1" was done with brush.  "Yellow Sunrise #2" was done with palette knife.  Each is an explosion of color, as well as of pigment.  There is much paint laid down on panel, creating a strong sense of urgency and energy.  Possibly works done en plein air.  Both are exciting and energetic works by EEG.
Both
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"Moonrise, Star and Bowing Pine at Last Light", Oil on Panel, 14 X 20 Inches, Signed lower left

This painting is very "Sandzen-esque", but is done in the most mature style and methods of the artist, uniquely his own.  The mixture of colors throughout is a study in complementary color theory... the primary colors of red, blue and yellow being dynamically set against the secondary colors, especially green.  It is no accident that the most important subject area is reserved for the highest color dynamic:  the reds and violets of the clouds set starkly behind the greens of the pine tree.  The composition flows nicely, with every element of the landscape ultimately pointing to the moon.  This is perhaps the finest of all the EEG moon paintings we have ever seen.
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"Rising Moon on Hazy Evening", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches

This painting is a vignette of the one above, the same tree treated in a different atmosphere. With the last light of day on a ridge, the "bowing" pine overlooks a hazy and atmosphereic moonrise.  Despite its samll size, this painting is a fully realized work.  The colors of the setting sun invade those of the tree an rocks, the pinks of the high sky greet the rising moon.  A fine work by EEG.
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"Moon Peeks through the Branches of a Lightning Struck Pine", Oil on Panel, 8 X 8 Inches

The impressionist sky of this fine small work create a vibration of color.  The sky is make of strokes of red, blue and pale green to offset the greens, reds and yellows of the pine, grass and rocks.   A nice detail of the broken branch makes for a device to carry the eyes back to the moon, as it shines behind the branches of the pine.
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"Quiet Moonrise on a Windy Ridge", Oil on panel, 6 X 9 Inches

It's the color that defines the work of any impressionist.  In this small moon painting, the color is bright, contrasing and dynamic, yet very accurately conveying the "impression" of the last hour of the sun and the rising of the pale moon.  The colors of the sky range from soft yellows and reds to greens and blues, with the bolder red in the clouds defining the light from the setting sun.  A small but brilliant representation of the subject by EEG.
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"Moon and Star in a Luminous Sky", Oil on panel, 9 X 12 Inches

Painted over a black underpainting... the reddish lavender color is made with magenta mixed with ultramarine blue (as noted on the back of the painting) for the sky, to make a very vibrant and silvery shimmering effect that can't be captured by the camera.  The use of yellow is sparing, but added in just such a way to create that reflection of light of the moon on the clouds and add great warmth overall.  This work ranks with the best of the moon paintings.
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"Windy Plains", Oil on Panel, 6 X 9 Inches

We have occasionally seen drawings and paintings of the same scene, but never at the same time.  This is an interesting study itself into the working methods of the artist.  The drawing is very bold, leading to the bold coloration of the painting.  There is definitely a connection, despite the difference in the media.

The drawing is available separately on our EEG Drawing Page
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"Moon over Estes Park, Colorado" (Longs Peask and Mt. Meeker), Oil on Panel, 18 X 24 Inches

Is there a finer painting of the early evening than this one?  This work does the night justice.  The depiction of the famous landmarks is epic in scale, with the setting sun and rising moon simply adding drama and color to the scene.  For size and visual impact, this is one of the great works of the artist.
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"Moon over Blue Mountains", Oil on Panel, 7 X 10 Inches  SOLD
"Moon and Shredded Clouds", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD

 When the moon peeks from behind clouds, there is a playfulness that comes.  To add to that, this painting is filled with dynamic and vibrant interactions of colors.  We find no fewer than two different reds, three different yellows and three different blues in this small work that is filled with energy, not only from the color, but also from the techniques of their application with palette knife.
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"Hay Stacks, Rising Sun", Oil on Panel, 16 X 22 Inches

 A major work by E E Glass.  The sun is barely showing its presence over the horizon.  The sky is a glowing yellow and green, while the reds and lavendars of the rising misty clouds compliment the other colors nicely.  However, it's the multitude of color in the hay stacks that generate the most interest.  Each stack is painted differently, with the foreground one a fine mix of all the colors of the rest of the painting... and the overall work maintaining a feel of unity.  A wonderful painting in every sense.
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"Moon over Dark Lake", Oil on Panel, 10 X 14 Inches

The fine feeling of the rising moon is always a startling subject by EE Glass, no matter how many of these one sees.  The greens, yellows and blues of the moon and sky are mingled with cool red colors to give this work a vitality of its own.  The reflection of the light on the water only adds to the effect of a shimmering light.  A fine painting.
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"Approaching Storm, Setting Sun", Oil on Panel, 14 X 20 Inches

This is a bit larger work by EEG.  The powerful feel of the lightning is created by a subtle change in color, which I hope we have captured in our images.  The setting sun is done in warm yellows and reds... while the lightning is done in cool blues, pinks and lavenders.  The color difference dramatizes the lightning, just as one would expect from nature.  An added feature of the painting is the golden lining to the clouds at the upper right.  This echoes the form of the strike of the lightning but also echoes the color of the setting sun.
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"Sunset on an Ancient Tree", Oil on Panel, 14 X 18 Inches

Somewhere along the line, Emerson Glass must have studied the work of JMW Turner. The movement of skies and rich and dramatic application of color were his trademark. The invasion and movement of color in this work by E E Glass in the evening sky permeate the entire scene in a way that leaves no doubt of the time of day... bold here, subtle there. Lights and shadows in the tree are done with dramatic flair.
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"Cave in the Rock", Oil on Panel, 14 X 20 Inches

One of the great abilities of the artist is to depict the dramatic effects of light on his subjects.  In this work, the setting sun permeates the scene, yet brings a definite sense of the time of day.  The reds and golds glow with resounding effects on the rocks, trees and water in such a way to unify the entire composition.
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"Moon River", Oil on Canvasboard, 12 X 16 Inches

One of a series of "Sandzen-esque" paintings by E E Glass.  This one with the rising moon and dramatic color combinations that reflect the influance of Birger Sandzen on the artist.  The two were friends and apparently did some painting together, as Glass did not attend Bethany College nor live in Lindsborg.  It is possible that the two artists spent some time together when Sandzen was older, either in Estes Park or, more likely, southern Colorado.
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"Kansas Twister", Oil on Canvasboard, 12 X 16 Inches

One can feel the movement and fury of the storms of Kansas in the artist's paintings.  In this one, the surety of the closely approaching storm is at hand.  The sun peaks through barely as the clouds and elements swirl around it.  A very dramatic work of a dramatic moment.
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"Cloud Study #1", Oil on Thin Masonite Panel, 8 X 11 Inches  SOLD
"Cloud Study #2", Oil on Thin Masonite Panel, 8 X 11 Inches  SOLD

 Two small works that, despite being studies, are complete in themselves.  These works are very much thorough expressions of the impressionist "manifesto", or basic philosophies in painting.  The larger image of these paintings give a good look at the constant interactions of primary and secondary colors, typical of the best of the American impressionist tradition.

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"Tree Top", Oil on Thin Masonite Panel, 9 X 12 Inches

Finding beauty in even the most mundane of subjects... is this not one of the great purposes of artists?  In this case, Emerson Glass has taken on the task of painting a simple broken limb, found in the top of a tree, and making it into something even greater.  This is a deceptively complex painting.  The abstract design formed by the broken limb and the opposing direction and forces of the remaining trunk, branches, pine needles and other elements, all work together to form a fine and complete work of art.

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"Burnoff, Morning Mist", Oil on Panel, 12 X 16 Inches

The morning sun peaks through the clouds and mist as it rises with first light.  The sun is brilliantly presented, with much overlaying of paint, each extending the impact of the light from the sun.  The mist and clouds are nicely colored with yellows and reds, softly rising and dissipating with the warmth of the sun.  The bent pine is much in evidence of years of exposure to the elements of the Rocky Mountains, with some dead branches and the effects of a long past lightning strike.  Overall, a beautifully colored work, typically contrasting the greens of the tree with reds and yellows of the sky.

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"Full Moon, Bright Star and Shredded Clouds", Oil on Panel, 18 X 24 Inches

The application of paint is unique in this major work.  The night sky is enhanced by the impressionist handling of the vibrant color, both with brush and palette knife.  Also the largest of the moon paintings, this ranks with the most important of the E. E. Glass moon images.

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"Clouds", Oil on Panel, 30 X 40 Inches

We have been told by cynical people that the painting doesn't exist by EEG any larger than a breadbox.  This large major work proves us all wrong.  The morning clouds drift lazily both below and above this isolated ridge, where the wind blown pines greet the morning sun.  This is the largest of all the Glass paintings, and perhaps the most important.

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"Hazy Sunrise", Oil on Panel, 20 X 20 Inches

The invasion of the colors of the morning permeate the entire scene in a way that leaves no doubt of the time of day... bold here, subtle there.  The sky is a striking lemon color, resolving to a yellow green in the upper sky and into a reddish lavender at the horizon.  The distant hillside is a fine mix of lavendar blue and red, blending into the distance.  Lights and shadows in the tree are done with dramatic flair.  This painting ranks with the most important of the E. E. Glass paintings.

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"Storm in the Rockies", Oil on Panel, 12 X 12 Inches

A dramatic painting.  The color is more subtle and in keeping with the subject matter, but that is made up for with the lights and darks.  The swirling clouds are beautifully painted and one gets the feel of the storm in every way.  It can be seen why the trees are shaped as they are in the high mountains.  It's of note that the shapes in the tree echo the shapes of the clouds.  Nicely done.

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"Bent Aspen", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches

A veritable study in the dynamics of color and how the primary and secondary colors work off each other.  The contrasts are rather brilliant, not so much for the lights and darks, but for the juxtaposition of color compliments.  In Wyoming, aspens often grow as depicted here, the seedlings protected by the rocks until mature, and then the trees themselves shaped by the elements.

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"Life of the Artist" (Campfire in the Wilderness), Oil on Panel, 8 X 8 Inches

A bit unusual for the artist, and a self-portrait of sorts.  The clear night sky, moon and stars while the artist spends his night as he lived it... in solitude, with a warm fire for comfort.  His tent is off to the right, the moon and sky reflecting in the water of a nearby lake and, of course, his old bent tree for company that picks up the light from the campfire.

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"Solar Wind", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches

Paint... is that not what painting is all about?  In this exceptional fine work, it's the paint that takes center stage.  With nothing less than genius, the artist has coordinated the three primary colors (red, yellow and blue) into an energetic display of dramatic color interaction.  This work flows with energy and movement, making for something greater than the sum of the parts.

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"Moon over Blue Hills" (Study), Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches

This small painting is the study for the very important "Moon over Blue Hills" (see below).  Although the artist did not usually paint en plein air, it seems evident that this work was done on location as a preparation for the larger version.  An significant work in its own right.

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"Moon and Shredded Clouds", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches

Emerson Glass has caught the animation and dynamics of the cloud movement.  In addition, the rendering of the light from the moon creates a separate striking effect, adding substance and flesh to the clouds. Overall, an exceptional impressionist painting, despite its small size.

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"Moonrise over Kansas Cornstalks", Oil on Panel, 5 X 7 Inches

A very early work, executed with brush, before the artist's development of style with thick impasto.  The effect of the rising moon and planets is dynamically created with the primary colors, but with an overall quiet and harmonious feel.  Beautifully done in a small painting.

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"Thunderstorm over Blue Hills", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches

The overall feel of this work is strength, with a charged atmosphere of light and dark, that is carried out with effect in the small size. There is a sense of expectation of a storm in the fading light. The strong use of the three primary colors (red, blue and yellow) is a device used by Emerson Glass to establish the dynamics of the subject.

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"Early Spring" (Southern Colorado), Oil on Canvasboard, 12 X 16 Inches

A very early work, executed with brush, before the artist's development of style with thick impasto applircation of paint.  The overall feel of this work is soft and atmospheric.  The clouds speak of fair sky and warmer times to come.  A very pleasing and quiet painting, with harmony of color.

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"Rocky Mountain Sunset", Oil on Panel, 10 X 14 Inches

Impossible to photograph.  An impossible sunset.  The only way you will ever appreciate this painting is to see it in person.  We nearly didn't post it on our web site... however, we will GUARANTEE  this:  if you buy this painting and don't like it, we will refund your purchase price in full, no questions asked.  That's how strongly we feel about this painting.

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"Moonrise through a Bannered Pine", Oil on Panel, 16 X 16 Inches

A stunning interpretation of the effects of the bright full moon shining through the branches of  this old bannered pine tree.  The glow of the moon peaks through and then changes the color of the tree and the reflections all around.  The last glow of the setting sun is revealed in the soft pinks and pale lavendars of the sky around the moon and colors of the tree itself.  A fine major impressionist painting.

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"Lone Pine", Oil on Panel, 8 X 8 Inches

An absolute jewel of a painting.  This small work is a complete expression of the impressionist philosophy. Please look closely at the detail images... where the mixture of colors blends with the eyes, one color layered carefully with another.  The overall effect in the sky is exceedingly bright with dapples of reds and yellows mixed throughout the overall greens, blues and violets.  The bright and dark colors of the pine tree compliment the rest in perfect fashion.  Arguably the finest EE Glass painting "pound for pound" that we have seen to date.

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"Morning with Rising Mist at Ship Rock", Oil on Panel, 8 X 11 Inches

If you ever want to get the feel of the wind on a cool morning in the mountains of the old west, just look at the close-up images of this dynamic painting.  The strokes of the brush and knife swirl with infading energy, the lines of color seeming to have a life of their own.  A painting filled with energy.

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"Hay Bales" (Rising Sun, Waning Moon), Oil on Canvasboard, 12 X 16 Inches

In the Kansas hayfields, the hay bales pick up the color of the morning sun.  The real subject of this painting is the sky... full of colors, from the reds and yellows of sunrise to the greens, blue-greens and violets of the upper sky.  The impresisionist's dream... the fullness of color expression.

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"Full Moon, Swirling Clouds", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches

Energy. This is the characteristic that describes this painting more than any other. The vibrant colors play off each other to create an explosion of energetic reaction against each other.  It is easy to see the influance of Vincent van Gogh as well as Birger Sandzen.. A fine painting, executed on a black underpainting.

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"Boulders and Pines", Oil on Panel, 8 X 10 Inches

The impressionist "manifesto" calls for subjects to be defined by color, rather than academic drafting.  In this fine small painting, the color is what makes the eyes excited.  A close examination of the sky is a virtual study in the principles of impressionist painting.  An intimate scene where life flourishes.

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"Knotted Tree at Sunset", Oil on Panel, 10 X 12 Inches

A fine accomplished painting of a tree that has bent into a knot, most likely at the timberline.  Other trees, dead or fallen are near.  The setting sun, just below the horizon, colors the entire scene with a warm reddish glow.  Misty clouds rise from the valley below and reflect the light of the sun.  A worthy painting.

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"Jagged Rocks, Full Moon", Oil on Panel, 12 X 16 Inches

There are times when the last light of the sun creates a dramatic sensation of light and movement.  In this painting, the interplay of colors is further enhanced by the opposing action of the rocks and clouds.  The drama of these movements is counterbalanced by the stillness of the moon, painted with its own set of color relationships.  A great expression of color.

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"Moonrise over Blue Hills" (Southern Colorado), Oil on Panel, 16 X 22 Inches

We do not like to play too heavily on the relationship between EE Glass and Birger Sandzen... however, in this fine major painting, the influence is obvious.  The color palette is very similar, but the application and working methods are quite different.  This painting is a major effort for the artist, perhaps the best we have seen to date.  The small (6 X 8 inch) study for this painting is also available.

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"Moonrise in a High Mountain Mist", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches

A fine small painting, complete in itself.  This work nicely depicts the rising of the full moon over a sea of wispy clouds and mist.  A fine work with a clear sense of dramatic light and primary colors.  Painted on an old wood slice once used to back another artwork.

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"Moon over Estes Park", Oil on Panel, 20 X 28 Inches

A large and major work by the artist.  This fine moon painting was obviously worked over with great care, especially in the sky, where layer after layer is found, creating a wonderful expression of the night.  The inclusion of stars (upper right) adds a poingnant touch to this fine painting.

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"Twisted Tree", Oil on Panel, 14 X 14 Inches

A complete and mature impressionist painting by E E Glass.  The images do not do justice to what is there... the astounding interplay of colors and thoroughly natural presentation of a tree that no one would belive unless you showed it to them.  The manner in which the crecent moon emerges through the branches of the tree is a stroke of  artistic merit that will win this painting a place in American art.

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"Setting Crescent Moon over the Front Range", Oil on Panel, 11 X 14 Inches

Imaging this painting was particularly difficult.  The reds in the painting are no so purple as the images suggest, but are a fine warm red, reflecting the character of the moon and landscape very nicely.  The ultimate challenge of the impressionist artist... creating a work that is filled with peace, yet with also with energy..  Such is this work.

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"Lightning Storm over the Western Plains", Oil on Canvaspanel, 10 X 14 Inches

A difficult task it is to capture the drama of an approaching storm... especially the effects of lightning.  In this fine painting, the artist has captured moment of the flash, anticipating the roll of thunder.  A fine and dramatic work.

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"Moon & Wind Torn Clouds", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches

Luminous.  On a moonlit night with a shredding wind, the clouds move quickly, presenting a challenge to any artist.  E. E. Glass was a master at depicting the movement, as well as the light effects of the night.  A complete painting despite its small size.

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"Impression, Wyoming Sunrise", Oil on Panel, 18 X 24 Inches

Perhaps the most significant painting we have seen to date by the artist.  This work is large and filled with color.  Please view the detail images to get an idea of just how much color is in this work.  A  stunning accomplishment of true impressionism.

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Study for "Impression, Wyoming Sunrise", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches

the finished study for the painting above.  With the impressionists, the task was to define a scene with color.  Emerson Glass was a superb draftman, able to catch every detail of whatever he was engaged in and took on the challenge of redefining the character of the scene with color.

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"Moon over the High Plains, Wyoming", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches

The "high plains" are the rolling flatlands that rest around 7,000 - 9,000 feet above sea level. The air is rarified and the moon casts a brilliant light on the landscape, so that even after the sun sets, the moon makes the night almost like day.

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"Moon over Mt. Moran, Tetons, Wyoming #1", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches

The first of a pair of painting (see #2 below).  This painting is the more subtle of the two. The clouds swirl around the light of the full moon, fully reflected in the water.  The colors range from deep blue-violet to red and yellow-green.  The mood of quietness in this painting speaks of the nights in Wyoming.

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"Moon over Mt. Moran, Tetons, Wyoming #2", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches

The second of a pair of painting (see #1 above).  This painting is the more stark and dramatic of the two.  These surely were painted on the same night, but this one with a slight hint of weather moving in.  The intensity of the light and dark are increased for greater drama.

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"Impression:  Blazing Sunset", Oil on Panel, 8 X 10 Inches

What can one say, except "explosion of color"?  In this fine small painting, there is the utmost in experimentation of color and color harmonies and contrasts.  The greens vibrate with the reds, the violets and yellows vibrate with the deeper blues.  A magnificent example of the impressionist philosophy.

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"Sunset on an Ancient Tree", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches

The light from the setting sun filters in over the rocks and falls at last on this fine old tree.  Dispite the scars of time and elements, the tree stands, the light only emphasizing its strength. This is a later one for the artist, and perhaps a statement of how his years have stood the test of time?

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"Storm near Estes Park, Colorado", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches

For anyone who has spent time in the mountains, there is an awareness that storms can come at any time.  This painting depicts this drama of clouds rolling in quickly and spots of light showing through.  The light hits the foreground ridge of rocks and trees, framed with the movement of clouds.   A slim peek of distant mountains with a sliver of blue sky gives the painting great depth and perspective.

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"Roots", Oil on Panel, 14 X 20 Inches

A large painting.  Despite the realistic subject and manner of painting, this ultimately is an abstract work, weaving the complex root patterns into a burst of color like flames or flower.  The tree is obviously fallen for many years, the roots thrust up in a sculptural form, enhanced by their intricate texture, holes and striking animation.  This work was of importance to the artist, speaking of perhaps his own life intricacies.

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"Moon over Long's Peak, Estes Park, Colorado", Oil on Panel, 10 X 14 Inches

This is a painting of peace and quiet.  Long's Peak and Mt. Meeker rest under a full moon, while the glow of the sun turns the distant peaks a soft red.  The same glow touches the rocks, but it's the soft yellow light of the moon that sets the tone.  Much of the scene is in shadow, drawing our attention to the moon and colorful sky.

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"Big Tree at Sunset" (Study), Oil on panel, 8 X 10 Inches

We are sometimes asked, "how do you determine a study or finished painting?".  Good question.  Some are obvious, in that there appears a larger version of the same composition.  Other times, it's more of a comparison with similar works, so it's different with every artist.  This study is actually fully developed and stands on its own.

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"Wind Blown Pine at Sleeping Dog Rock", Oil on panel, 8 X 8 Inches

This marvelous small painting is a vignette, not a study.  The painting concentrates on the small bannered pine seen in the lower right of the painting below ("Sleeping Dog Rock").  It is a complete statement fully developed.  The color reflects the painting below, but the composition nicely develops the character of the lone pine, growing among the rocks and surviving the challenge of the elements.

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"Sleeping Dog Rock", Oil on panel, 10 X 14 Inches

This painting takes us where few people go... a place where one can see for a hundred miles and leave the crowded cities behind, and feel the vast space of the world in which we live.  The image may be stark and real, but the painting leads us into a flow of dreamy imagination of another life, another place.

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"Aspens among Red Rocks", Oil on panel, 12 X 16 Inches

A wonderful statement in the primary colors... red, blue and yellow.  The center of the painting is a virtual feast of colors, each superimposed on the other to create a fine vibrating interaction.  Added to these are the scattered secondary colors of green and muted purples.  A quality exercise in color.

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"Bannered Tree" (Windy Ridge, Setting Crescent Moon), Oil on panel, 9 X 12 Inches

This was the place preferred by Emerson Glass.  Here he sought the trees that showed the character of west, surviving even in the harshest of circumstances. Literally, the storms of life hit these trees, where the winds blow up to hurricane force, lightning strikes and the snows run deep.

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"Cycles of Life - Trees in the Rocky Mountains", Oil on panel, 12 X 16 Inches

In the Rocky Mountains, there are many scenes of the cycles of life... here a fallen old tree, surrounded by new growth coming up to take its place.  The trees and sky in the background attest to the movement of wind and elements, constantly reshaping the evironment.

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"Sunrise on Barren Ridge" (Study), Oil on panel, 6 X 9 Inches

With an interesting foreground, an artist can make even the simplest scene come alive.  The trees, rocks and wild flowers in the center create a focal point that belies the complexity of this fine small painting.

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"Quarter Moon: Dusk at Leaning Rock", Oil on panel, 10 X 14 Inches

There is a certain light that seems to glow but not overwhelm just at dusk.  At the far right of the painting, below the pale yellow moon, is the muted lavendar of the distant settling evening.  The tops of the trees and large rocks barely catch the last light.  Fine muted color to catch the most fleeting of moments of a day.

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"Sunrise on a Lightning Blasted Tree", Oil on panel, 12 X 16 Inches

The color of sunrise... the yellows and reds... make the mood of even a scarred tree seem tranquil.  One would normally think of these colors as aggitation and heat.  But here, they create an overall peace and unity to the painting.  The cooler reds in the rocks and complementary greens keep the scene alive.

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"Moon over Pikes Peak", Oil on panel, 12 X 16 Inches

Even in the night paintings, the artist finds much color.  You will do well to view the Detail Image of the moon and sky... a veritable feast of color, as well as a fine study in the juxtaposition of complementory colors and the their effects and interactions.

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"Moon over Pikes Peak" (Study), Oil on panel, 6 X 8 Inches

The conceptual study for the painting above.  This work stands on its own as a fine experiment in color relationships.  The larger version adheres closely to the study, but with a much expanded range of colors in all areas.

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"Fallen Pine, Rocky Mountains", Oil on panel, 11 X 14 Inches

The fallen trees were a recurring theme for the artist.  Perhaps there was some identifying with them... but more likely, it was the contrast in textures and colors that drew him to the subject.  Probably both.

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"Study in Green and Red" (Fallen Pine), Oil on panel, 8 X 10 Inches

It's often about the color... here the sky is painted a fine green to teal color, with soft cool reds to compliment them.  There are scattered small areas of blues and yellows throughout to create balance to a nice color experiment.

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"Sunrise in the Rockies", Oil on panel, 8 X 10 Inches

A literal explosion of color.  The images here do not do the painting justice at all.  The reds are a pleasant and intense warm red, surrounded by yellows and greens to make the entire sky vibrate.  The dark trees and foreground rocks amplify the color of the sky.

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"Moonlight on a Lightning Blasted Tree", Oil on panel, 7 X 9 Inches

The beauty and the danger go hand in hand in the high elevations of the Rockies.  The trees are exposed to wind and harsh conditions, but it's the lightning that often takes its toll.  This tree was ripped apart by lightning, but yet survives, even in the harsh environment.

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"Windy Pinnacle", Oil on panel, 12 X 16 Inches

If you have ever climbed to such a small knoll as this, you can understant the dynamics of nature in a profound way.  The wind rules everything, steadily gnawing away at the rocks, bending and twisting the trees and shredding the clouds.  Here, only the most tenacious life survives, setting a standard by with all other life can be measured.  These paintings represent the life of the artist like no other can.

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"Windy Pinnacle" (Study), Oil on panel, 7 X 9 Inches

The ultimate expression of the impressionist manifesto, if you can call it that.  The mixing of color one into the other;  the movement of the clouds, quickly applied;  the effects of lighting to dramtize the subject.  A marvelous painting.

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"Setting Quarter Moon over the Tetons", Oil on panel, 12 X 16 Inches

The reflection of the bright moon is everywhere... in the clouds, the water and, if you look closely, even in the outline of the mountains.  The abundant reds nicely counterbalance the overall blue/green of the sky.

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"Setting Quarter Moon over the Tetons" (Study ), Oil on panel, 6 X 8 Inches

In this study for the larger and more compete painting above is fresh and freely painted.  The violet pinks of the clouds create a dynamic for the blue/greens of the rest of the painting.

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"Bright Moon on a Rocky Ridge", Oil on panel, 10 X 14 Inches

The rising moon is brilliant in the eastern sky, while the rest of the scene is in shadow.  The focal point of the moon is brilliant with yellows and reds.  Not exaggerated, for anyone who has been in the dark hills on such a night.

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"Sunlit Tree at 9,000 Feet", Oil on panel, 8 X 10 Inches

Red, yellow, blue and green... the bright color for which the artist is known for.  The old and bent tree remains strong in the face of altitude, weather and wind.  Such trees begin amidst the rocks where, protected from the weather, they can root and be established.

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"Last Light, Rising Moon", Oil on panel, 22 X 30 Inches

The largest and most major work we have seen by the artist.  Suiting for it to be a moonrise painting.  In the High Sierras of California, the last light of the setting sun, is backlit from the moon.  A technical challenge for any artist.

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"Cornstalks, Quarter Moon", Oil on old wood panel, 6 X 8 Inches

This is a very early work, judging from the old panel on which it was executed.  We estimate this painting to be from the mid 1950's.  The panel is fragile, but the hand of the artist is unmistakingly there.

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"Wind River Range, Wyoming", Oil on panel, 14 X 18 Inches

There are few places on earth more rugged and beautiful than the Wind River area in northwestern Wyoming.  The last red glow of the settin sun colors the tops of the mountains, and the deep greens of the lower vegetation adds a nice complement.

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"Moonrise" (Study), Oil on gessoed board mounted fiber board panel, 6 X 8 Inches

An amazing small study painted on a black underpainting.  The contrasts set off the rising moon and make a most believable interpretation of the light effects.  The reds in the clouds add a vibrant color touch.

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"A Grizzly in the Rockies", Oil on panel, 10 X 14 Inches

The wildlife paintings of Emerson Glass are just as much color expressions as they are depictions of animals.  Here, the reds of the grizzly both blend and complement the blues, greens and yellows of the surrounding landscape.  The purples of the distant mountains are immediately juxtaposed with the same reds for a startling contrast.

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"Rocky Top", Oil on panel, 8 X 11 Inches

The windy ridge is a favorite theme of the artist.  The color possibilites are endless, contrasting the blues of the sky with the warm tones of the subject foreground.  This is an exciting work, both for the color as well as the motion of the clouds and trees.

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"Laramie Valley", Oil on panel, 9 X 12 Inches

Is it possible to show distance, even with bright color?  The question is resolved here nicely with this fine atmospheric painting.  Afternoon sun, bright color and far off distant mountains are all captured, even with pure color.

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"The Rawah Mountains of Colorado", Oil on panel, 6 X 8 Inches

The afternoon sun on the rocks serves as a stark contrast to the distant plains and mountains.  In this heavily painted work, please note the juxtaposition of the warm and cool colors, creating a vibrant dynamic of the complimentary colors.  A fine study in color contrasts.

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"Old Willow with Antelope", Oil on panel, 9 X 13 1/2 Inches

When the sun sets, the light often filters through different aspects of a scene.  Here the glowing reds and yellows of the last light sneak into the foreground, highlighting the tree and antelope.  A fine statement of color in late afternoon.

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"Moose at Sunrise" (Yellowstone), Oil on panel, 10 X 14 Inches  SOLD
Study
for "Moose at Sunrise" (Yellowstone), Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  SOLD

The final version of the study (below).  Visitors to today's Yellowstone National Park are often rewarded for rising early, finding a fine bull moose leisurely strolling in a nearby meadow or munching breakfast in a shallow pond.  This fine painting captures the atmospheric effects of a hazy morning, with the color of the sunrise invading every aspect of the quiet scene.

The effects of the hazy sunrise are complete in the nice small study.  The yellows of the rising sun invade every aspect of the work and even bring a glow to the back of the animal.  A color study with fine effects.

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Study for "Lavender Sky, Twilight with Setting Moon", Oil on Panel, 8 X 8 Inches

At last light, interesting things happen to color in a landscape.  The fading red glow of the setting sun combines with the darkness of the end of day.  This brings an invasion of color into the deepening shadows and causes the various elements in the scene to glow with the same color.  In this fine study, the work is actually a complete painting, with all details and effects in place, just as the larger version.

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 "Lavender Sky, Twilight, with Setting Moon", Oil on Panel, 16 X 16 Inches

The large and final version of the study (below).  The feel of this painting is remarkably similar to the study, the drawing, color and composition all bearing the same hand.  Read the notes for the study, they all applying to this fine and major work by E E Glass.

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"Moose in the Timberline (Rocky Mountains)", Oil on Panel, 12 X 16 Inches

The freedom and energy found in the laying of paint in this fine work reflect that of the subject.  The Rocky Mountains, from Colorado to Montana, have an edge to their atmosphere.  The rare air and hardness of the land make for a toughness, both in animals and men.  The moose typifies the character of the land and his presence is like a signal for requirement to survive.

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"Approaching Storm, Timberline", Oil on Panel, 7 X 7 Inches 

Some lessons and characteristics come from the masters.  Here, the influance of van Gogh is quite evident... the swirling clouds of color fit together well to make the statement of an approaching storm.  The feel of the vulnerability of life at the timberline is felt through the energy of applied pigments. 

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"Fallen Tree, Colorado" (Ponderosa Pine at Timberline), Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches

The fallen tree becomes a vehicle for carrying color for the artist.  This simple subject becomes complex with the multitude of reds, yellow, green and blues... all mixed by the eyes to blend into a wonder feast.  Please give attention to the colors in the sky detail, for an experience in color unlike any we have ever seen.

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"Rising Moon at the Timberline", Oil on Panel, 13 X 18 Inches

A major work by E. E. Glass.  Please view the detail images of this work, where impressionist techniques are fully explored.  The colors are not blended together, but rather are mixed in pools of pigment, producing dynamic color interactions.  These dynamics produce an animated color motion... an interplay of color and shapes that have the feel of live movement... the ultimate expression of impressionism in American art.

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"Sunrise on an Outcropping", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches  

This fine small painting exemplifies the artist's passion for color.  A simple subject profoundly executed... the three primary colors (red, blue and yellow) balanced with the three secondary colors (green, orange and purple).  A skilled and effective blast of color in a small space.

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"Timberline", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches 

You feel like you are there.  At the timberline, the trees struggle in the harsh environment, but some survive setting roots deep into the rocks for a strong grip and water.  Rocks take on the character of the time and season.  The influance of Glass's friend, Birger Sandzen, is felt strongly in this painting.

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"Stone Wall, San Antonio", Oil on Canvas Mounted on Panel, 8 X 10 Inches

Atmosphere and distance are beautifully rendered in this painting filled with arial perspective.  A variety of blues, greens and violets hold the distant elements of the town and distant mountains in place, while the strong warm colors of the red wall, large tree and other foreground elements create a strong dynamic.

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"Approaching Storm" (Thompson River, Colorado), Oil on Panel, 10 X 14 Inches

All the dynamics of nature are in play in this fine work... the approaching rain storm, the rushing mountain stream and the setting sun playing light in a dramatic scene.  A close look at the details of the paint reveals an urgent application, suggesting the need to get under cover very soon.  Long's Peak in the background.

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"Sierra Mountains, California", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches

This small painting of the California mountains is complete and fully realized. A fine bright work with a monumental feel despite its small size.  This work compares favorably with some of the finest efforts of Edgar Payne.

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"Emerald Lake", Oil on panel, 9 X 12 Inches  SOLD
Study for "Sierra Lake", Oil on panel, 3 X 5 Inches  SOLD

A quick study, probably done on location.  The effects of the emerald green water are set in stunning contrast to the reds of the rocks and background mountains.

A fine bright study in contrasting colors. Probably executed on location in California.  The visual impact of this work is strong for such a small work, attracting attention even from a distance.

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"Sunset at the Rocks of Vedauwoo" (Wyoming), Oil on panel, 9 X 12 Inches

A difficult subject, with back lighting from the setting sun reflecting intensely in the sky but only highlighting the rocks and trees in the foreground.  A technical challenge for any artist.

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"Hazy Sunset, Colorado", Oil on panel, 10 X 10 Inches

A truely marvelous example of the American impressionist style (and reflecting great influance of Glass's friend, Birger Sandzen). The colors are freely and boldly applied with contrasts and harmonies perfectly matched throughout this fine and complete work.

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"Windswept Pines", Oil on panel, 12 X 16 Inches

A similar work to "Hazy Day, Colorado"... this larger painting was executed under midday light with the very feel of the wind in the clouds... the conditions in which the pine is caused to bend and twist in directions contrary to it direction of preferred growth.

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"Our Last Night in Lindsborg", Oil on panel, 9 X 12 Inches

If you read the biography of E. E. Glass, you will glimpse the affection he had for Birger Sandzen. As a bit of testimony to that feeling, this painting was titled by Nina Glass in conversations and discussions of this work. Her obvious respect for the older Sandzen was often referred to discussions with Mr. Tate.

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"Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado", Oil on panel, 8 X 12 Inches

One can easily imagine Glass sitting side by side with Birger Sandzen while this was being painted. Sandzen did a similar work of the same scene in large format.

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"Kansas Twister, Setting Sun", Oil on panel, 6 X 8 Inches

Was this work of an actual tornado which Glass witnessed in Kansas... or was this done as a reflection of his own life?... all is conjecture, but the end result of this painting is a fine expression of the turbulence of either or both.

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"Windy Ridge, Rising Moon", Oil on panel, 10 X 14 Inches

It was the night that drew out the best in Emerson Glass. This work and the study for it following are both fine expressions of that yearning he had for the evening sky.

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Study for "Windy Ridge, Rising Moon", Oil on panel, 5 X 7 Inches

There are significant differences between this study and the finished studio work above. The light and dark contrasts are switched, making the rising moon an even more striking object. The streaking meteorite (or perhaps a comet) are not included in the larger work. There is actually a possibility that the sky object is Haley's Comet, which would have made this work to be executed in 1986, a year before the artist's death. A coincidence that the comet has always been an icon of impending death?

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"Emerald Sky, Rising Moon" (Ponderosa Pine), Oil on panel, 12 X 12 Inches

This is the quintescential work of Emerson Glass. The moon paintings are perhaps the most important of the artist's works, and this one is the finest of the moon paintings we have found to date. The execution in this painting is free and confident. The colors are bright and full of contrasts, yet the painting maintains the quiet mood of the rising moon, mingling briefly in the branches of the windswept ponderosa pine. A truly complete and satisfying work of art.

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"Sunrise at Chok-Wee-A-Ho", Oil on panel, 9 X 12 Inches

Little is known of the location or meaning of "Chok-Wee-A-Ho"... obviously an Indian name, but no references can be found for location or translation of this mysterious scene. The far ridge is painted in a very loose fashion, similar to the work of Vincent van Gogh, an artist known to be much admired by E. E. Glass.

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"Haystacks, Marquette, Kansas", Oil on panel, 9 X 12 Inches

Marquette is a small farm community less than an hour's drive north from Lindsborg, Kansas. Quietly in the country in the early morning hours is another favorite time of Emerson Glass. This is one of the few works that is identified for location on the back of the painting.

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"Morning Light on Long's Peak" (Junipers and Pines), Oil on panel, 13 X 18 Inches

Emerson Glass is known to have lived in or near Estes Park, Colorado during the mid to later years of his life. The mixture of the colors in the sky of this painting is particular satifying of a difficult technical challenge. A larger work much influanced by Birger Sandzen.

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"About to Strike", Oil on panel, 7 X 10 Inches

You can almost feel the scales glimmering off the back of this trout. A quickly executed impressionist painting of a difficult subject makes this work even more impressive. The reflections of the sky in the water and distortions caused by ripples are both executed in believable fashion. The lively paint strokes only add to the activity of both water and fish.  Be sure to view the detail image on our gallery postings.

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"A Deer in the Aspens", Oil on panel, 8 X 10 Inches

At first glance, one hardly notices the deer hidden behind the quaking white birch trees. Technically, this painting has layers of thick pigments, one on top of the other, overlapping to reveal color underneath. A challenge for an artist to keep the eye moving and interested in the central subject.
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"A Pond in the Rockies", Oil on panel, 5 X 7 Inches

This small work was probably done on location. It's size and obvious quickness of execution done en plein air define this work as a study. Apparently done with a setting sun in late winter, the cold of the evening was likely setting in on the artist as he worked.

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"Cycles of Life", Oil on panel, 8 X 10 Inches

In the high ridges and lakes of the Rocky Mountains, life often struggles above the timber line. The elements of cold and wind take their toll, both of life and form of the vegetation. Here, the colors of the painting are quickly applied in contrasts, adding to the feel of that struggle.

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"Setting Sun, Setting Moon", Oil on panel, 9 X 12 Inches

Again, the early evening hours are revealed in a dramatic expression of light. The sun is setting, as is the sliver of the early moon. Not so evident in our images are the subtle mixtures of color around the moon and the planet Venus... dabs of light that indicate the effect of even the smallest light and its effect on the atmosphere. A fine and satisfying work that attracts much attention, even from a distance.

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"Last Light at Sugarloaf", Oil on canvas mounted to panel, 9 X 12 Inches

This painting is an ultimate expression of the color interplays that the American impressionists are known for. The sky colors range from pinks and yellows on the left to violets and blues on the right. The colors are picked up in succeeding layers in the mountains, overlaid again and again to offer reflections of the colors of a cool late afternoon in the Rocky Mountains. This is a fine impressionist painting, evincing the full range of the color mastery of Emerson Glass.

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"Old Pine, Wyoming", Oil on panel, 9 X 12 Inches

Even on a calm day, the feel of the old west is upon the landscape of Colorado and Wyoming. The old pines cling stubbornly to their place and display their age, not so much by their size as by their character and success in living in the most demanding of conditions.

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"Rocks at Vedauvoo, Wyoming", Oil on panel, 8 X 10 Inches

The contrast here is between the hard rocks of the famous rock climbing area of Wyoming and the trees that grow there. The change of weather is subtly evident in this work, as the cool colors of the sky indicate a coming change of conditions.

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"Moonrise over the Rockies", Oil on Panel, 7 X 10 Inches

This painting marks a breakthrough in the artist's challenges to depict the rising moon in an impressionist manner, as it breaks its light through the scattered clouds. A difficult technical challenge for any artist.

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"14 Below Zero, Windy", Oil on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches

This painting is titled on the back... a testimony to the answering of the call to the real west by Mr. Glass. Undoubtedly done on location on a day with the tempterature and conditions evinced in the title. Few people would venture into the Rocky Mountains on such a day... however, an artist must if he is to convey the feel and reality of just such conditions. The pioneering spirit of the early artists who explored the west did not live in comfort, but carried their supplies on their backs and walked the trails to work.

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"Manitou Springs" (A Series of three Paintings), Oils on Panel, 9 X 12 Inches each

We have placed these three works together as one painting. They depict the same mountain range of Colorado at three different times of day... morning, midday and early evening with the rising moon. These works are very quickly done with brush and paint, with an urgency to them that reflects the need of the artist to capture the essence of the scene under different conditions.
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"Lone Pine", Oil on Panel, 12 X 16 Inches

Color over color over color... that is the way of this fine painting. You can see in our images the striking overlays of color that add to the impact of this scene of morning on a high ridge in the Colorado Rockies. The clouds have a quick fleeing feeling to add to the motion of the atmosphere, the lower clouds in the valleys relfecting the same. A fine work depicting a difficult technical challenge of light and atmosphere.

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"Lemon Meringue Pie", Oil on Panel, 6 X 8 Inches

The artist most certainly had a sense of humor... finding a whimsical but studied expression in even the most common of subjects. The pie is the subject, but the real object of this work is the expression of color.
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"The Cathedral Group" (Grand Tetons, Wyoming), Oil on panel, 14 X 18 Inches

This is a fairly early work... the ultimate techniques of the artist not yet fully developed. Nonetheless, the effects of light from the setting sun fill this landscape with color, overlaid repeatedly with others. The grandeur of the Tetons of Wyoming is fully developed, as if one were standing there in awe of the majestic mountains.

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